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Differences in reported linguistic thermal sensation between Bangla and Japanese speakers

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Physiological Anthropology, June 2017
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Title
Differences in reported linguistic thermal sensation between Bangla and Japanese speakers
Published in
Journal of Physiological Anthropology, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40101-017-0139-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Aklima Khatun, Md. Abdul Hasib, Hisaho Nagano, Akihiro Taimura

Abstract

Thermal sensation is a fundamental variable used to determine thermal comfort and is most frequently evaluated through the use of subjective reports in the field of environmental physiology. However, there has been little study of the relationship between the semantics of the words used to describe thermal sensation and the climatic background. The present study investigates the linguistic differences in thermal reports from native speakers of Bangla and Japanese. A total of 1141 university students (932 in Bangladesh and 209 in Japan) responded to a questionnaire survey consisting of 20 questions. Group differences between Bangladeshi and Japanese respondents were then tested with a chi-square test in a crosstab analysis using SPSS (version 21). For the Bangla-speaking respondents, the closest feeling of thermal comfort was "neutral" (66.6%) followed by "slightly cool" (10.2%), "slightly cold" (6.0%), "slightly hot" (4.1%), and "cold" (3.8%). For the Japanese respondents, the closest feeling of thermal comfort was "cool" (38.3%) followed by "slightly cool" (20.4%), "neutral" (14.6%), "slightly warm" (13.1%), and "warm" (10.7%). Of the Bangladeshi respondents, 37.7% reported that they were sensitive to cold weather and 18.1% reported that they were sensitive to hot weather. Of the Japanese respondents, 20.6% reported that they were sensitive to cold weather and 29.2% reported that they were sensitive to hot weather. Of the Bangladeshi respondents, 51.4% chose "higher than 29 °C" as hot weather and 38.7% of the Japanese respondents chose "higher than 32 °C" as hot weather. In the case of cold weather, 43.1% of the Bangladeshi respondents selected "lower than 15 °C" as cold weather and 53.4% of the Japanese respondents selected "lower than 10 °C" as cold weather. Most of the Bangla-speaking respondents chose "neutral" as the most comfortable temperature, and most of the Japanese respondents chose "cool." Most of the Bangladeshi respondents reported that they were sensitive to "cold temperatures," but most of the Japanese respondents reported that they were sensitive to "hot temperatures."

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 18 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 3 17%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 2 11%
Researcher 2 11%
Lecturer 1 6%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 6%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 9 50%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 3 17%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 6%
Environmental Science 1 6%
Sports and Recreations 1 6%
Energy 1 6%
Other 1 6%
Unknown 10 56%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 June 2017.
All research outputs
#10,036,958
of 11,317,953 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Physiological Anthropology
#142
of 166 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#223,034
of 267,496 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Physiological Anthropology
#2
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,317,953 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 166 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.1. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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