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Manifestations of HIV stigma and their impact on retention in care for people transitioning from prisons to communities

Overview of attention for article published in Health & Justice, June 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
12 tweeters

Citations

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16 Dimensions

Readers on

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66 Mendeley
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Title
Manifestations of HIV stigma and their impact on retention in care for people transitioning from prisons to communities
Published in
Health & Justice, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40352-017-0054-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rebecca Kemnitz, Theresa C. Kuehl, Karli R. Hochstatter, Emily Barker, Anna Corey, Elizabeth A. Jacobs, Michael D. Repplinger, William J. Ehlenbach, David W. Seal, James M. Sosman, Ryan P. Westergaard

Abstract

While most people living with HIV who are incarcerated in United States receive appropriate HIV care while they are in prison, interruptions in antiretroviral therapy and virologic failure are extremely common after they are released. The purpose of this study was to describe whether and how HIV stigma influences continuity of care for people living with HIV while they transition from prison to community settings. We conducted semi-structured, telephone-based interviews with 32 adults who received HIV care while residing in a Wisconsin state prison, followed by a second interview 6 months after they returned to their home community. Interview transcripts were analyzed by an interdisciplinary research team using conventional content analysis. We identified themes based on commonly-reported experiences that were characterized as internalized stigma, perceived stigma, vicarious stigma, or enacted stigma. All four forms of HIV stigma appeared to negatively influence participants' engagement in community-based HIV care. Mechanisms described by participants included care avoidance due to concerns about HIV status disclosure and symptoms of depression and anxiety caused by internalized stigma. Supportive social relationships with clinic staff, professional case managers and supportive peers appeared to mitigate the impact of HIV stigma by increasing motivation for treatment adherence. HIV stigma is manifest in several different forms by people living with HIV who were recently incarcerated, and are perceived by patients to negatively influence their desire and ability to engage in HIV care. By being cognizant of the pervasive influence of HIV stigma on the lives of criminal justice involved adults, HIV care providers and clinical support staff can ameliorate important barriers to optimal HIV care for a vulnerable group of patients.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 66 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 66 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 13 20%
Student > Bachelor 11 17%
Researcher 9 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 11%
Other 5 8%
Other 12 18%
Unknown 9 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 15 23%
Psychology 13 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 12 18%
Social Sciences 7 11%
Computer Science 1 2%
Other 6 9%
Unknown 12 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 July 2017.
All research outputs
#3,009,848
of 13,385,200 outputs
Outputs from Health & Justice
#40
of 88 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#70,307
of 268,031 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Health & Justice
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,385,200 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 88 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,031 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them