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Molecular diagnosis of Pseudoterranova decipiens s.s in human, France

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, June 2017
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (56th percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

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24 Mendeley
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Title
Molecular diagnosis of Pseudoterranova decipiens s.s in human, France
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12879-017-2493-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Julie Brunet, Bernard Pesson, Maude Royant, Jean-Philippe Lemoine, Alexander W. Pfaff, Ahmed Abou-Bacar, Hélène Yera, Emilie Fréalle, Jean Dupouy-Camet, Gema Merino-Espinosa, Magdalena Gómez-Mateos, Joaquina Martin-Sanchez, Ermanno Candolfi

Abstract

Anisakis and Pseudoterranova are the main genera involved in human infections caused by nematodes of the Anisakidae family. Species identification is complicated due to the lack of differential morphological characteristics at the larval stage, thus requiring molecular differentiation. Pseudoterranova larvae ingested through raw fish are spontaneously eliminated in most cases, but mechanical removal by means of endoscopy might be required. To date, only very few cases of Pseudoterranova infection have been reported in France. A 19-year-old woman from Northeastern France detected, while brushing her teeth, a larva exiting through her mouth. The patient who presented with headache, diarrhea, and abdominal cramps reported having eaten baked cod. The worm was a fourth-stage larva with a size of 22 × 0.9 mm, and molecular biology identified it as Pseudoterranova decipiens sensu stricto (s. s.). In a second P. decipiens infection case, occurring a few months later, a worm exited through the patient's nose after she had eaten raw sea bream. These two cases demonstrate that Pseudoterranova infection is not uncommon among French patients. Therefore, molecular techniques should be more widely applied for a better characterization of anisakidosis epidemiology in France.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 24 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 17%
Researcher 3 13%
Student > Bachelor 3 13%
Lecturer 2 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 4%
Other 6 25%
Unknown 5 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 17%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 8%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 4%
Other 5 21%
Unknown 8 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 September 2017.
All research outputs
#6,731,306
of 11,753,826 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1,997
of 4,390 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#130,120
of 271,956 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#44
of 106 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,753,826 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,390 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,956 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 106 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.