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Preoperative cholesterol level as a new independent predictive factor of survival in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma treated with cyto-reductive nephrectomy

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, May 2017
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Title
Preoperative cholesterol level as a new independent predictive factor of survival in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma treated with cyto-reductive nephrectomy
Published in
BMC Cancer, May 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12885-017-3322-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hakmin Lee, Yong June Kim, Eu Chang Hwang, Seok Ho Kang, Sung-Hoo Hong, Jinsoo Chung, Tae Gyun Kwon, Cheol Kwak, Hyeon Hoe Kim, Jong Jin Oh, Sang Chul Lee, Sung Kyu Hong, Sang Eun Lee, Seok-Soo Byun

Abstract

The obesity and lipid metabolism were previously proposed to be related with the clinical outcomes of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). We tried to investigate the relationship between preoperative cholesterol level (PCL) and survival outcomes in patients with mRCC. We analysed the data of 244 patients initially treated with cyto-reductive nephrectomy after being diagnosed with mRCC. Patients were stratified into two groups according to the PCL cut-off level of 170 mg/dL. The postoperative survival rates were compared using Kaplan-Meier analysis and the possible predictors of patients' cancer-specific survival (CSS) and overall survival (OS) were tested using multivariate Cox-proportional hazard models. The low cholesterol group showed significantly worse postoperative CSS (p = 0.013) and OS (p = 0.009) than the high cholesterol group. On multivariate analysis, low PCL was revealed as an independent predictor of worse CSS (hazard ratio [HR], 2.162; 95% CI, 1.221-3.829; p = 0.008) and OS (HR, 2.013; 95% CI, 1.206-3.361; p = 0.007). Subsequent subgroup analysis showed that these results were maintained in the clear cell subgroup but not in the non-clear cell subgroup. Decreased PCL was significantly correlated with worse survival outcomes in patients with mRCC treated with cytoreductive nephrectomy. The underlined mechanism is still uncharted and requires further investigation.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 12 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 2 17%
Researcher 2 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 17%
Student > Bachelor 1 8%
Student > Master 1 8%
Other 2 17%
Unknown 2 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 3 25%
Psychology 2 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 8%
Unspecified 1 8%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 4 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 June 2017.
All research outputs
#9,073,185
of 11,332,694 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#2,743
of 4,154 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#192,075
of 267,218 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#45
of 64 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 4,154 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 64 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.