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Prevalence and prognostic implications of psychological distress in patients with gastric cancer

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, April 2017
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Title
Prevalence and prognostic implications of psychological distress in patients with gastric cancer
Published in
BMC Cancer, April 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12885-017-3260-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gun Min Kim, Seung Jun Kim, Su Kyung Song, Hye Ryun Kim, Beo Deul Kang, Sung Hoon Noh, Hyun Cheol Chung, Kyung Ran Kim, Sun Young Rha

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and prognostic significance of psychological distress in gastric cancer patients. The study population included 229 gastric cancer patients visiting Yonsei Cancer Center between November 2009 and March 2011. The distress was measured by available tools including the Modified Distress Thermometer (MDT), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), and Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale (CES-D). Patients with psychological distress were defined as those who scored above the cut-off values in both the MDT and either one of the HADS or CES-D. The median age of patients was 56 (range, 20 to 86) and 97 (42.4%) patients were with stage IV disease status at enrollment. The overall prevalence of psychological distress was 33.6% (95% CI: 27.5-39.8%) in 229 gastric cancer patients. In multiple logistic regression analysis, lower education level (odds ratio [OR] 2.39; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.11-5.17, P = 0.026) and higher disease stage (OR 2.72; 95% CI 1.47-5.03, P = 0.001) were associated with psychological distress. In stage I-III disease, patients with psychological distress had worse disease-free survival (DFS) (5-year DFS rate: 60% vs 76%, P = 0.49) compared with those without psychological distress. In stage IV disease (n = 97), patients with psychological distress showed poorer overall survival than those without psychological distress (median OS (Overall Survival): 12.2 vs. 13.8 months, P = 0.019). Psychological distress is common in patients with all stages of gastric cancer and is associated with worse outcomes.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 67 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 67 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 9 13%
Student > Postgraduate 6 9%
Student > Master 6 9%
Researcher 5 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 7%
Other 13 19%
Unknown 23 34%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 18 27%
Psychology 7 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 3%
Social Sciences 2 3%
Other 6 9%
Unknown 25 37%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 January 2018.
All research outputs
#10,501,771
of 13,785,324 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#3,053
of 5,180 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#179,030
of 267,693 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#1
of 1 outputs
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