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Outer membrane phospholipase A’s roles in Helicobacter pylori acid adaptation

Overview of attention for article published in Gut Pathogens, June 2017
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2 tweeters

Citations

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Readers on

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29 Mendeley
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Title
Outer membrane phospholipase A’s roles in Helicobacter pylori acid adaptation
Published in
Gut Pathogens, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13099-017-0184-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hilde S. Vollan, Tone Tannæs, Dominique A. Caugant, Gert Vriend, Geir Bukholm

Abstract

The pH of the human gastric mucosa varies around 2.5 so that only bacteria with strong acidic stress tolerance can colonize it. The ulcer causing Helicobacter pylori thrives in the gastric mucosa. We analyse the roles of the key outer membrane protein OMPLA in its roles in acid tolerance. The homology model of Helicobacter pylori outer membrane phospholipase A (OMPLA) reveals a twelve stranded β-barrel with a pore that allows molecules to pass with a diameter up to 4 Å. Structure based multiple sequence alignments revealed the functional roles of many amino acids, and led to the suggestion that OMPLA has multiple functions. Besides its role as phospholipase it lets urea enter and ammonium exit the periplasm. Combined with an extensive literature study, our work leads to a comprehensive model for H. pylori's acid tolerance. This model is based on the conversion of urea into ammonium, and it includes multiple roles for OMPLA and involves two hitherto little studied membrane channels in the OMPLA operon. The three-dimensional model of OMPLA predicts a transmembrane pore that can aid H. pylori's acid tolerance through urea influx and ammonium efflux. After urea passes through OMPLA into the periplasm, it passes through the pH-gated inner membrane channel UreI into the cytoplasm where urease hydrolyses it into NH3 and CO2. Most of the NH3 becomes NH4(+) that is likely to need an inner membrane channel to reach the periplasm. Two genes that are co-regulated with OMPLA in gastric Helicobacter operons could aid this transport. The NH4(+) that might leave the cell through the OMPLA pore has been implicated in H. pylor's pathogenesis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 29 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 29 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 24%
Student > Bachelor 6 21%
Student > Master 5 17%
Researcher 4 14%
Other 1 3%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 4 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 24%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 14%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 10%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 10%
Other 5 17%
Unknown 4 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 June 2017.
All research outputs
#6,826,624
of 11,421,045 outputs
Outputs from Gut Pathogens
#129
of 258 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#139,053
of 267,881 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Gut Pathogens
#5
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,421,045 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 258 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.6. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,881 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.