↓ Skip to main content

Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Spanish version of the Oxford Hip Score in patients with hip osteoarthritis

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, May 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
15 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
50 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Spanish version of the Oxford Hip Score in patients with hip osteoarthritis
Published in
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, May 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12891-017-1568-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jesús Martín-Fernández, Pedro Gray-Laymón, Antonio Molina-Siguero, Javier Martínez-Martín, Roberto García-Maroto, Isidoro García-Sánchez, Lidia García-Pérez, Vanesa Ramos-García, Olga Castro-Casas, Amaia Bilbao

Abstract

Osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip is a disease that entails a major burden for patients and the society as a whole. One way of measuring this burden for the patient is through impact on Health-related Quality of Life (HRQL). The Oxford Hip Score (OHS) is a well-known tool to measure HRQL in patients with OA of the hip. This study aims to assess the psychometric properties of the Spanish-adapted version of the OHS, including its reliability, validity, and sensitivity to change. Prospective observational study that included 361 patients diagnosed with hip OA (according to the criterion of the American College of Rheumatology) from 3 different Spanish regions. Their HRQL was assessed using a generic questionnaire, the EQ-5D-5 L, and two specific ones (the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, WOMAC, and the OHS) adapted to Spanish. There was a follow-up period of 6 months, and the acceptability, psychometric properties, presence of ceiling and floor effects, validity, reliability, and sensitivity to changes of the OHS were measured. The OHS was fully answered in 99.4% of cases with no indication of ceiling or floor effects. Its factor structure can be explained in a single dimension. Its discriminative capacity was very good compared to the groups generated by the WOMAC and the EQ-5D-5 L. The correlation between the OHS and dimensions of the WOMAC or EQ-5D-5 L utilities was ≥0.7. Excellent test-retest reliability (ICC = 0.992; CI95%: 0.994-0.998) and internal consistency (Cronbach's α = 0.928) were observed. The minimal clinically important difference (MCID) was 7.0 points, and the minimum detectable change (MDC) was 5.5 points. The effect size for moderate improvement in perceived HRQL was 0.73, similar to that of WOMAC dimensions and higher than the EQ-5D-5 L. The Spanish-adapted version of the OHS is a useful, acceptable tool for the assessment of perceived HRQL in patients with hip OA, and has psychometric properties similar to those of the WOMAC that allow for discriminating both a patient's condition at a given moment and changes that can occur over time.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 50 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 50 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 14%
Researcher 7 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 12%
Student > Bachelor 4 8%
Student > Postgraduate 2 4%
Other 6 12%
Unknown 18 36%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 32%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 12%
Psychology 2 4%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 2%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 21 42%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 June 2017.
All research outputs
#7,081,973
of 11,370,524 outputs
Outputs from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#1,426
of 2,326 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#150,568
of 266,607 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#49
of 60 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,370,524 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,326 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,607 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 60 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.