↓ Skip to main content

Dated tribe-wide whole chloroplast genome phylogeny indicates recurrent hybridizations within Triticeae

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, June 2017
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
59 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
52 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Dated tribe-wide whole chloroplast genome phylogeny indicates recurrent hybridizations within Triticeae
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12862-017-0989-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nadine Bernhardt, Jonathan Brassac, Benjamin Kilian, Frank R. Blattner

Abstract

Triticeae, the tribe of wheat grasses, harbours the cereals barley, rye and wheat and their wild relatives. Although economically important, relationships within the tribe are still not understood. We analysed the phylogeny of chloroplast lineages among nearly all monogenomic Triticeae taxa and polyploid wheat species aiming at a deeper understanding of the tribe's evolution. We used on- and off-target reads of a target-enrichment experiment followed by Illumina sequencing. The read data was used to assemble the plastid locus ndhF for 194 individuals and the whole chloroplast genome for 183 individuals, representing 53 Triticeae species and 15 genera. We conducted Bayesian and multispecies coalescent analyses to infer relationships and estimate divergence times of the taxa. We present the most comprehensive dated Triticeae chloroplast phylogeny and review previous hypotheses in the framework of our results. Monophyly of Triticeae chloroplasts could not be confirmed, as either Bromus or Psathyrostachys captured a chloroplast from a lineage closely related to a Bromus-Triticeae ancestor. The most recent common ancestor of Triticeae occurred approximately between ten and 19 million years ago. The comparison of the chloroplast phylogeny with available nuclear data in several cases revealed incongruences indicating past hybridizations. Recent events of chloroplast capture were detected as individuals grouped apart from con-specific accessions in otherwise monopyhletic groups.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 52 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Unknown 51 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 25%
Researcher 9 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 10%
Student > Bachelor 5 10%
Professor 2 4%
Other 8 15%
Unknown 10 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 33 63%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 13%
Environmental Science 1 2%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 2%
Unknown 10 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 August 2017.
All research outputs
#8,931,885
of 11,623,235 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1,884
of 2,230 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#177,054
of 268,333 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#43
of 47 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,623,235 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,230 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.0. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,333 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 47 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.