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Pathogens at the livestock-wildlife interface in Western Alberta: does transmission route matter?

Overview of attention for article published in Veterinary Research, February 2014
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1 tweeter

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Title
Pathogens at the livestock-wildlife interface in Western Alberta: does transmission route matter?
Published in
Veterinary Research, February 2014
DOI 10.1186/1297-9716-45-18
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mathieu Pruvot, Susan Kutz, Frank van der Meer, Marco Musiani, Herman W Barkema, Karin Orsel, Pruvot, Mathieu, Kutz, Susan, van der Meer, Frank, Musiani, Marco, Barkema, Herman W, Orsel, Karin

Abstract

In southwestern Alberta, interactions between beef cattle and free-ranging elk (Cervus elaphus) may provide opportunities for pathogen transmission. To assess the importance of the transmission route on the potential for interspecies transmission, we conducted a cross-sectional study on four endemic livestock pathogens with three different transmission routes: Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus and Bovine Herpesvirus 1 (predominantly direct transmission), Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) (indirect fecal-oral transmission), Neospora caninum (indirect transmission with definitive host). We assessed the occurrence of these pathogens in 28 cow-calf operations exposed or non-exposed to elk, and in 10 elk herds exposed or not to cattle. We characterized the effect of species commingling as a risk factor of pathogen exposure and documented the perceived risk of pathogen transmission at this wildlife-livestock interface in the rural community. Herpesviruses found in elk were elk-specific gamma-herpesviruses unrelated to cattle viruses. Pestivirus exposure in elk could not be ascertained to be of livestock origin. Evidence of MAP circulation was found in both elk and cattle, but there was no statistical effect of the species commingling. Finally, N. caninum was more frequently detected in elk exposed to cattle and this association was still significant after adjustment for herd and sampling year clustering, and individual elk age and sex. Only indirectly transmitted pathogens co-occurred in cattle and elk, indicating the potential importance of the transmission route in assessing the risk of pathogen transmission in multi-species grazing systems.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 75 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 73 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 16 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 20%
Student > Master 11 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 9%
Student > Bachelor 6 8%
Other 14 19%
Unknown 6 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 27 36%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 20 27%
Environmental Science 7 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 3%
Other 6 8%
Unknown 10 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 February 2014.
All research outputs
#17,266,906
of 21,363,193 outputs
Outputs from Veterinary Research
#857
of 1,137 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#214,913
of 290,652 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Veterinary Research
#6
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,363,193 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,137 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 290,652 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.