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Screen-based sedentary behavior during adolescence and pulmonary function in a birth cohort

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, June 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)

Mentioned by

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7 tweeters

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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72 Mendeley
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Title
Screen-based sedentary behavior during adolescence and pulmonary function in a birth cohort
Published in
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12966-017-0536-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bruna Gonçalves C. da Silva, Ana M. B. Menezes, Fernando C. Wehrmeister, Fernando C. Barros, Michael Pratt

Abstract

Adolescents spend many hours in sitting activities as television viewing, video game playing and computer use. The relationship between sedentary behavior and respiratory health remains poorly elucidated. To date there have been no studies evaluating the relationship between sedentary behavior and pulmonary function in young populations. The purpose of this study is to examine the association between the trajectory of screen-based sedentary behavior from 11 to 18 years and pulmonary function at 18 years in a Brazilian birth cohort. Data from a longitudinal prospective study conducted among the participants of the 1993 Pelotas (Brazil) Birth Cohort. Time spent on television, video games, and computers during a weekday was self-reported at ages 11, 15 and 18 years. For each age, sedentary behavior was defined as the sum of time spent on these screen-based activities. To evaluate the sedentary behavior trajectory during adolescence group-based trajectory modeling was used. Outcome variables were three pulmonary function parameters: forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), and peak expiratory flow (PEF), evaluated by spirometry, at 18 years expressed as z-scores. Crude and adjusted linear regressions, stratified by sex, were performed. The three-group trajectory of sedentary behavior was the best fitting model. The trajectory groups were: always high (representing 38.8% of the individuals), always moderate (54.1%), and always low (7.1%). In the adjusted analyses, boys in the always-low group for sedentary behavior had higher FVC at 18 years (β = 0.177; 95% CI:0.027;0.327; p = 0.021) than boys in the always-high group. There were no differences for other pulmonary function parameters in boys. No significant association was found for girls. The trajectory of screen-based sedentary behavior throughout adolescence was not consistent associated with pulmonary function at 18 years.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 72 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 72 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 15%
Student > Bachelor 8 11%
Researcher 5 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 7%
Other 5 7%
Other 11 15%
Unknown 27 38%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 13%
Sports and Recreations 6 8%
Psychology 3 4%
Neuroscience 2 3%
Other 4 6%
Unknown 34 47%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 December 2017.
All research outputs
#3,014,131
of 12,287,089 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#907
of 1,274 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#78,906
of 268,603 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#30
of 37 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,287,089 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 75th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,274 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.8. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,603 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 37 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.