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JC virus granule cell neuronopathy onset two months after chemotherapy for low-grade lymphoma

Overview of attention for article published in Cerebellum & Ataxias, June 2017
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Title
JC virus granule cell neuronopathy onset two months after chemotherapy for low-grade lymphoma
Published in
Cerebellum & Ataxias, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40673-017-0066-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kathryn B. Holroyd, Elias S. Sotirchos, Scott R. DeBoer, Kelly A. Mills, Scott D. Newsome

Abstract

Granule cell neuronopathy (GCN) is a rare disease caused by the JC virus, leading to degeneration of cerebellar granule cell neurons. Primarily described in patients with AIDS, it has also been diagnosed in patients with lymphoproliferative diseases and after long-term treatment with immune-suppressing medications such as natalizumab. A 69 year old woman presented with progressive ataxia which began 2 months after initiation of treatment for follicular low-grade B cell lymphoma with rituximab/bendamustine, and progressed for 2 years prior to admission. Extensive prior evaluation included MRI that showed atrophy of the cerebellum but normal CSF analysis and serum studies. Neurologic exam on admission was notable for severe appendicular ataxia and fatigable end-gaze direction-changing horizontal nystagmus. FDG-PET/CT scan was unremarkable and repeat lumbar puncture revealed 2 WBCs/mm(3), 148 RBCs/mm(3), glucose 70 mg/dL, protein 37.7 mg/dL and negative flow cytometry/cytopathology. Standard CSF JC virus PCR testing was negative, but ultrasensitive TaqMan real-time JC virus PCR testing was positive, consistent with JC virus-related GCN. Because of the diagnostic challenges in identifying GCN, a high threshold of suspicion should be maintained in patients with an immune-suppressing condition such as lymphoma or on immune-suppressing agents such as rituximab, even shortly after initiation of therapy.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 2 18%
Other 2 18%
Unspecified 1 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 9%
Student > Master 1 9%
Other 1 9%
Unknown 3 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 36%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 9%
Unspecified 1 9%
Computer Science 1 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 9%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 3 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 June 2017.
All research outputs
#9,128,784
of 11,405,459 outputs
Outputs from Cerebellum & Ataxias
#49
of 68 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#190,865
of 263,603 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cerebellum & Ataxias
#7
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,405,459 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 68 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.0. This one is in the 5th percentile – i.e., 5% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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