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健康是本钱 - Health is my capital: a qualitative study of access to healthcare by Chinese migrants in Singapore

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal for Equity in Health, June 2017
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Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

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84 Mendeley
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Title
健康是本钱 - Health is my capital: a qualitative study of access to healthcare by Chinese migrants in Singapore
Published in
International Journal for Equity in Health, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12939-017-0567-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Wai Jia Tam, Wei Leong Goh, Jeffrey Chua, Helena Legido-Quigley

Abstract

Since the 1970s, Singapore has turned into one of the major receiving countries of foreign workers in Southeast Asia. Over the years, challenges surrounding access to healthcare by Chinese migrant workers have surfaced globally. This study aims to explore the experiences of Chinese migrants accessing primary and secondary/tertiary healthcare in Singapore, and the opportunities for overcoming these barriers. We conducted 25 in-depth interviews of 20 Chinese migrants and five staff from HealthServe, a non-governmental organization serving Chinese migrants in Singapore from October 2015 to January 2016. Interviews were transcribed and analysed inductively adopting thematic analysis. Chinese migrants in Singapore who were interviewed are mainly middle-aged breadwinners with multiple dependents. Their concept of health is encapsulated in a Chinese proverb ", meaning "health is my capital". Health is defined by them as a personal asset, needed to provide for their families. From their health-seeking behaviors, six pathways were identified, highlighting different routes chosen and resulting outcomes depending on whether their illness was perceived as major or minor, and if they sought help from the private or public sector private or public sector. Key barriers were identified relating to vulnerabilities during the migration process, during their illness, when consulting with healthcare providers, and during repatriation. A transactional doctor-patient culture in China contrasts with the trust migrants place in Singaporean's public health system, perceived as equitable and personable. However, challenges remain for injured migrants who sought help from the private sector and those with chronic diseases. Policy recommendations to increase patient autonomy enabling choice of healthcare provider and provide for non-work related illnesses are suggested. Partnerships between migrant advocacy organizations and various stakeholders such as hospitals, government agencies and employers can be strengthened.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 84 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 84 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 16 19%
Researcher 14 17%
Student > Bachelor 13 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 7%
Other 11 13%
Unknown 18 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 20 24%
Social Sciences 12 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 10%
Psychology 7 8%
Business, Management and Accounting 4 5%
Other 14 17%
Unknown 19 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 April 2020.
All research outputs
#11,978,331
of 19,855,939 outputs
Outputs from International Journal for Equity in Health
#1,260
of 1,717 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#143,466
of 282,114 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal for Equity in Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,855,939 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,717 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.3. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 282,114 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them