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Conceptualisation of job-related wellbeing, stress and burnout among healthcare workers in rural Ethiopia: a qualitative study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, June 2017
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

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18 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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37 Dimensions

Readers on

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272 Mendeley
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Title
Conceptualisation of job-related wellbeing, stress and burnout among healthcare workers in rural Ethiopia: a qualitative study
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12913-017-2370-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Medhin Selamu, Graham Thornicroft, Abebaw Fekadu, Charlotte Hanlon

Abstract

Wellbeing of healthcare workers is important for the effective functioning of health systems. The aim of this study was to explore the conceptualisations of wellbeing, stress and burnout among healthcare workers in primary healthcare settings in rural Ethiopia in order to inform the development of contextually appropriate interventions. A qualitative study was conducted in a rural zone of southern Ethiopia. A total of 52 frontline primary healthcare workers participated in in-depth interviews (n = 18) or Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) (4 groups, total n = 34). There were 35 facility based healthcare professionals and 17 community-based health workers. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Most participants conceptualised wellbeing as absence of stress rather than as a positive state. Many threats to wellbeing were identified. For facility-based workers, the main stressors were inadequate supplies leading to fears of acquiring infection and concerns about performance evaluation. For community health workers, the main stressor was role ambiguity. Workload and economic self-sufficiency were a concern for both groups. Burnout and its symptoms were recognised and reported by most as a problem of other healthcare workers. Derogatory and stigmatising terms, such as "chronics", were used to refer to those who had served for many years and who appeared to have become drained of all compassion. Most participants viewed burnout as inevitable if they continued to work in their current workplace without career progression. Structural and environmental aspects of work emerged as potential targets to improve wellbeing, combined with tackling stigmatising attitudes towards mental health problems. An unmet need for intervention for healthcare workers who develop burnout or emotional difficulties was identified. Ethiopian primary healthcare workers commonly face job-related stress and experience features of burnout, which may contribute to the high turnover of staff and dissatisfaction of both patients and providers. Recent initiatives to integrate mental healthcare into primary care provide an opportunity to promote the wellbeing of healthcare workers and intervene to address burnout and emotional problems by creating a better understanding of mental health.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 18 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 272 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 272 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 42 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 33 12%
Student > Bachelor 32 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 27 10%
Researcher 15 6%
Other 38 14%
Unknown 85 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 48 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 37 14%
Psychology 28 10%
Social Sciences 23 8%
Business, Management and Accounting 11 4%
Other 29 11%
Unknown 96 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 March 2022.
All research outputs
#1,985,276
of 21,924,413 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#770
of 7,306 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#38,700
of 286,966 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#2
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,924,413 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,306 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 286,966 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.