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Insights into the Geobacillus stearothermophilus species based on phylogenomic principles

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Microbiology, June 2017
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Title
Insights into the Geobacillus stearothermophilus species based on phylogenomic principles
Published in
BMC Microbiology, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12866-017-1047-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

S. A. Burgess, S. H. Flint, D. Lindsay, M. P. Cox, P. J. Biggs

Abstract

The genus Geobacillus comprises bacteria that are Gram positive, thermophilic spore-formers, which are found in a variety of environments from hot-springs, cool soils, to food manufacturing plants, including dairy manufacturing plants. Despite considerable interest in the use of Geobacillus spp. for biotechnological applications, the taxonomy of this genus is unclear, in part because of differences in DNA-DNA hybridization (DDH) similarity values between studies. In addition, it is also difficult to use phenotypic characteristics to define a bacterial species. For example, G. stearothermophilus was traditionally defined as a species that does not utilise lactose, but the ability of dairy strains of G. stearothermophilus to use lactose has now been well established. This study compared the genome sequences of 63 Geobacillus isolates and showed that based on two different genomic approaches (core genome comparisons and average nucleotide identity) the Geobacillus genus could be divided into sixteen taxa for those Geobacillus strains that have genome sequences available thus far. In addition, using Geobacillus stearothermophilus as an example, we show that inclusion of the accessory genome, as well as phenotypic characteristics, is not suitable for defining this species. For example, this is the first study to provide evidence of dairy adaptation in G. stearothermophilus - a phenotypic feature not typically considered standard in this species - by identifying the presence of a putative lac operon in four dairy strains. The traditional polyphasic approach of combining both genotypic and phenotypic characteristics to define a bacterial species could not be used for G. stearothermophilus where many phenotypic characteristics vary within this taxon. Further evidence of this discordant use of phenotypic traits was provided by analysis of the accessory genome, where the dairy strains contained a putative lac operon. Based on the findings from this study, we recommend that novel bacterial species should be defined using a core genome approach.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 96 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 96 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 25 26%
Student > Master 18 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 7%
Researcher 6 6%
Other 9 9%
Unknown 22 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 32 33%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 21 22%
Chemistry 5 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 5%
Engineering 4 4%
Other 5 5%
Unknown 24 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 June 2017.
All research outputs
#6,538,588
of 11,410,328 outputs
Outputs from BMC Microbiology
#753
of 1,611 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#126,497
of 261,767 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Microbiology
#17
of 54 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,410,328 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,611 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 261,767 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 54 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.