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Long-term cognitive outcome of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia with Lewy bodies: dual disease is worse

Overview of attention for article published in Alzheimer's Research & Therapy, June 2017
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)

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18 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

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58 Mendeley
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Title
Long-term cognitive outcome of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia with Lewy bodies: dual disease is worse
Published in
Alzheimer's Research & Therapy, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13195-017-0272-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Frédéric Blanc, Rachid Mahmoudi, Thérèse Jonveaux, Jean Galmiche, Gilles Chopard, Benjamin Cretin, Catherine Demuynck, Catherine Martin-Hunyadi, Nathalie Philippi, François Sellal, Jean-Marc Michel, Gregory Tio, Melanie Stackfleth, Pierre Vandel, Eloi Magnin, Jean-Luc Novella, Georges Kaltenbach, Athanase Benetos, Erik A. Sauleau

Abstract

Longitudinal studies of dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) are rare. Clinically, DLB is usually considered to worsen into Alzheimer's disease (AD). The aim of our study was to compare the rate of the cognitive decline in DLB, AD, and the association of the two diseases (AD + DLB). Using the Regional Network for Diagnostic Aid and Management of Patients with Cognitive Impairment database, which includes all the patients seen at all memory clinics (medical consultation and day hospitals) in four French regions, and beta regression, we compared the longitudinal the Mini-Mental State Examination scores of 1159 patients with AD (n = 1000), DLB (n = 131) and AD + DLB (association of the two) (n = 28) during follow-up of at least 4 years. The mean follow-up of the patients was 5.88 years. Using beta regression without propensity scores, the comparison of the decline of patients with AD and patients with DLB did not show a significant difference, but the decline of patients with AD + DLB was worse than that of either patients with DLB (P = 0.006) or patients with AD (P < 0.001). Using beta regression weighted by a propensity score, comparison of patients with AD and patients with DLB showed a faster decline for patients with DLB (P < 0.001). The comparison of the decline of patients with AD + DLB with that of patients with DLB (P < 0.001) and patients with AD (P < 0.001) showed that the decline was clearly worse in the patients with dual disease. Whatever the analysis, the rate of decline is faster in patients with AD + DLB dual disease. The identification of such patients is important to enable clinicians to optimise treatment and care and to better inform and help patients and caregivers.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 18 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 58 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 58 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 14%
Student > Bachelor 5 9%
Researcher 4 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 5%
Other 7 12%
Unknown 22 38%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 16%
Neuroscience 4 7%
Psychology 4 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 3%
Other 10 17%
Unknown 26 45%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 April 2022.
All research outputs
#2,363,914
of 21,301,913 outputs
Outputs from Alzheimer's Research & Therapy
#521
of 1,096 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#45,326
of 285,206 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Alzheimer's Research & Therapy
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,301,913 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,096 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 285,206 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them