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Modulation of hepatic perfusion did not improve recovery from hepatic outflow obstruction

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pharmacology and Toxicology, June 2017
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2 tweeters

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4 Dimensions

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14 Mendeley
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Title
Modulation of hepatic perfusion did not improve recovery from hepatic outflow obstruction
Published in
BMC Pharmacology and Toxicology, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40360-017-0155-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

J. Arlt, W. Wei, C. Xie, A. Homeyer, U. Settmacher, U. Dahmen, O. Dirsch

Abstract

Focal hepatic venous outflow obstruction frequently occurs after extended liver resection and leads to a portal hypertension, arterial hypoperfusion and parenchymal necrosis. In this study, we investigated the pharmacological modulation of liver perfusion and hepatic damage in a surgical model of hepatic outflow obstruction after extended liver resection by administration of 5 different drugs in comparison to an operative intervention, splenectomy. Male inbred Lewis rats (Lew/Crl) were subjected to right median hepatic vein ligation + 70% partial hepatectomy. Treatment consisted of a splenectomy or the application of saline, carvedilol or isosorbide-5-mononitrate (ISMN) (5 mg · kg(-1) respectively 7,2 mg · kg(-1) per gavage 12 h(-1)). The splenectomy was performed during operation. The effect of the treatments on hepatic hemodynamics were measured in non-operated animals, immediately after operation (n = 4/group) and 24 h after operation (n = 5/group). Assessment of hepatic damage (liver enzymes, histology) and liver cell proliferation (BrdU-immunohistochemistry) was performed 24 h after operation. Furthermore sildenafil (10 μg · kg(-1) i.p. 12h(-1)), terlipressin (0.05 mg · kg(-1) i.v. 12 h(-1)) and octreotide (10 μg · kg(-1) s.c. 12 h(-1)) were investigated regarding their effect on hepatic hemodynamics and hepatic damage 24 h after operation (n = 4/group). Carvedilol and ISMN significantly decreased the portal pressure in normal non-operated rats from 11,1 ± 1,1 mmHg (normal rats) to 8,4 ± 0,3 mmHg (carvedilol) respectively 7,4 ± 1,8 mmHg (ISMN). ISMN substantially reduced surgery-induced portal hypertension from 15,4 ± 4,4 mmHg to 9,6 ± 2,3 mmHg. Only splenectomy reduced the portal flow immediately after operation by approximately 25%. No treatment had an immediate effect on the hepatic arterial perfusion. In all treatment groups, portal flow increased by approximately 3-fold within 24 h after operation, whereas hepatic arterial flow decreased substantially. Neither treatment reduced hepatic damage as assessed 24 h after operation. The distribution of proliferating cells appeared very similar in all drug treated groups and the splenectomy group. Transient relative reduction of portal pressure did not result in a reduction of hepatic damage. This might be explained by the development of portal hyperperfusion which was accompanied by arterial hypoperfusion.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 14 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 3 21%
Student > Master 3 21%
Student > Bachelor 2 14%
Professor 1 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 7%
Other 2 14%
Unknown 2 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 50%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 7%
Computer Science 1 7%
Sports and Recreations 1 7%
Other 1 7%
Unknown 2 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 April 2018.
All research outputs
#9,774,679
of 12,755,705 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pharmacology and Toxicology
#172
of 258 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#175,432
of 262,706 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pharmacology and Toxicology
#6
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,755,705 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 258 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,706 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.