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'Single molecule': theory and experiments, an introduction

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Nanobiotechnology, January 2013
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Title
'Single molecule': theory and experiments, an introduction
Published in
Journal of Nanobiotechnology, January 2013
DOI 10.1186/1477-3155-11-s1-s1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Daniel Riveline

Abstract

At scales below micrometers, Brownian motion dictates most of the behaviors. The simple observation of a colloid is striking: a permanent and random motion is seen, whereas inertial forces play a negligible role. This Physics, where velocity is proportional to force, has opened new horizons in biology. The random feature is challenged in living systems where some proteins--molecular motors--have a directed motion whereas their passive behaviors of colloid should lead to a Brownian motion. Individual proteins, polymers of living matter such as DNA, RNA, actin or microtubules, molecular motors, all these objects can be viewed as chains of colloids. They are submitted to shocks from molecules of the solvent. Shapes taken by these biopolymers or dynamics imposed by motors can be measured and modeled from single molecules to their collective effects. Thanks to the development of experimental methods such as optical tweezers, Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), micropipettes, and quantitative fluorescence (such as Förster Resonance Energy Transfer, FRET), it is possible to manipulate these individual biomolecules in an unprecedented manner: experiments allow to probe the validity of models; and a new Physics has thereby emerged with original biological insights. Theories based on statistical mechanics are needed to explain behaviors of these systems. When force-extension curves of these molecules are extracted, the curves need to be fitted with models that predict the deformation of free objects or submitted to a force. When velocity of motors is altered, a quantitative analysis is required to explain the motions of individual molecules under external forces. This lecture will give some elements of introduction to the lectures of the session 'Nanophysics for Molecular Biology'.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 54 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 1 2%
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 52 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 26%
Student > Bachelor 9 17%
Researcher 7 13%
Professor 4 7%
Student > Master 4 7%
Other 10 19%
Unknown 6 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Physics and Astronomy 12 22%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 20%
Chemistry 7 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 9%
Engineering 4 7%
Other 8 15%
Unknown 7 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 February 2014.
All research outputs
#17,268,117
of 21,364,317 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Nanobiotechnology
#728
of 1,141 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#145,426
of 201,452 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Nanobiotechnology
#5
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,364,317 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,141 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.7. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 201,452 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.