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Olfactory coding from the periphery to higher brain centers in the Drosophila brain

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Biology, June 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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20 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages

Citations

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42 Dimensions

Readers on

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134 Mendeley
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Title
Olfactory coding from the periphery to higher brain centers in the Drosophila brain
Published in
BMC Biology, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12915-017-0389-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yoichi Seki, Hany K. M. Dweck, Jürgen Rybak, Dieter Wicher, Silke Sachse, Bill S. Hansson

Abstract

Odor information is processed through multiple receptor-glomerular channels in the first order olfactory center, the antennal lobe (AL), then reformatted into higher brain centers and eventually perceived by the fly. To reveal the logic of olfaction, it is fundamental to map odor representations from the glomerular channels into higher brain centers. We characterize odor response profiles of AL projection neurons (PNs) originating from 31 glomeruli using whole cell patch-clamp recordings in Drosophila melanogaster. We reveal that odor representation from olfactory sensory neurons to PNs is generally conserved, while transformation of odor tuning curves is glomerulus-dependent. Reconstructions of PNs reveal that attractive and aversive odors are represented in different clusters of glomeruli in the AL. These separate representations are preserved into higher brain centers, where attractive and aversive odors are segregated into two regions in the lateral horn and partly separated in the mushroom body calyx. Our study reveals spatial representation of odor valence coding from the AL to higher brain centers. These results provide a global picture of the olfactory circuit design underlying innate odor-guided behavior.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 20 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 134 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 134 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 43 32%
Researcher 24 18%
Student > Master 11 8%
Student > Bachelor 10 7%
Student > Postgraduate 8 6%
Other 20 15%
Unknown 18 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 47 35%
Neuroscience 44 33%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 8%
Physics and Astronomy 5 4%
Computer Science 2 1%
Other 7 5%
Unknown 18 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 August 2019.
All research outputs
#2,777,596
of 22,353,257 outputs
Outputs from BMC Biology
#780
of 1,946 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#50,076
of 286,578 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Biology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,353,257 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,946 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 286,578 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them