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Significantly enhanced lung metastasis and reduced organ NK cell functions in diet-induced obese rats

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Obesity, July 2017
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4 tweeters

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14 Dimensions

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Title
Significantly enhanced lung metastasis and reduced organ NK cell functions in diet-induced obese rats
Published in
BMC Obesity, July 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40608-017-0161-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

J. Spielmann, J. Hanke, D. Knauf, S. Ben-Eliyahu, R. Jacobs, G. I. Stangl, I. Bähr, H. Kielstein

Abstract

Obesity was identified as a major risk factor for malignant diseases, but underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Natural killer (NK) cells, a pivotal aspect of innate immunity, are capable of identifying and killing virally infected and tumor cells. Previous studies have shown altered NK cell functions in obesity, and the current study aimed to investigate the relationship between altered NK cell functions and increased cancer risk in obesity. To induce obesity male F344-rats received a high-fat diet (34% fat) or a control diet (4% fat). Thereafter, syngeneic mammary adenocarcinoma cells (MADB106) or a vehicle were intravenously (i.v.) injected. 15 min after injection, half of each group of rats were killed, lungs removed and immunohistochemically stained. Numbers of NK cells, MADB106 cells and NK cell-tumor cell interactions were quantified. Twenty-one days after tumor-cell injection the other half group of rats was killed and lung metastases were counted and relative mRNA concentrations of different NK cell receptors were determined. After short-term MADB106-challenge, DIO fed animals showed significantly decreased NK cell numbers in the blood and NK cell-tumor cell interactions in the lung as compared to their control littermates. Twenty-one days after MADB106 injection, the lungs of the DIO fed rats showed significantly more lung metastases compared to control animals, accompanied by reduced relative mRNA concentrations of the activating NK cell receptor NKG2D. We conclude that induction of obesity in F344-rats leads to reduced lung NK cell function against tumor cells and results in significantly enhanced lung metastasis as compared to lean animals. It can be hypothesized that obesity-induced altered NK cell functions play an important role in cancer growth and metastasis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 14 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 2 14%
Student > Master 2 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 7%
Other 1 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 7%
Other 3 21%
Unknown 4 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 7%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 7%
Unknown 6 43%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 July 2017.
All research outputs
#6,852,619
of 11,454,620 outputs
Outputs from BMC Obesity
#96
of 144 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#136,876
of 260,430 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Obesity
#6
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,454,620 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 144 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.4. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 260,430 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.