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Southampton PRegnancy Intervention for the Next Generation (SPRING): protocol for a randomised controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in Trials, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

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18 Dimensions

Readers on

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180 Mendeley
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Title
Southampton PRegnancy Intervention for the Next Generation (SPRING): protocol for a randomised controlled trial
Published in
Trials, October 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13063-016-1603-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Janis Baird, Mary Barker, Nicholas C. Harvey, Wendy Lawrence, Christina Vogel, Megan Jarman, Rufia Begum, Tannaze Tinati, Pamela Mahon, Sofia Strommer, Taylor Rose, Hazel Inskip, Cyrus Cooper

Abstract

The nutritional status and health of mothers influence the growth and development of infants during pregnancy and postnatal life. Interventions that focus on improving the nutritional status and lifestyle of mothers have the potential to optimise the development of the fetus as well as improve the health of mothers themselves. Improving the diets of women of childbearing age is likely to require complex interventions that are delivered in a socially and culturally appropriate context. In this study we aim to test the efficacy of two interventions: behaviour change (Healthy Conversation Skills) and vitamin D supplementation, and to explore the efficacy of an intervention that combines both, in improving the diet quality and nutritional status of pregnant women. Women attending the maternity hospital in Southampton are recruited at between 8 and 12 weeks gestation. They are randomised to one of four groups following a factorial design: Healthy Conversation Skills support plus vitamin D supplementation (1000 IU cholecalciferol) (n = 150); Healthy Conversation Skills support plus placebo (n = 150); usual care plus vitamin D supplementation (n = 150); usual care plus placebo (n = 150). Questionnaire data include parity, sunlight exposure, diet assessment allowing assessment of diet quality, cigarette and alcohol consumption, well-being, self-efficacy and food involvement. At 19 and 34 weeks maternal anthropometry is assessed and blood samples taken to measure 25(OH) vitamin D. Maternal diet quality and 25(OH) vitamin D are the primary outcomes. Secondary outcomes are women's level of self-efficacy at 34 weeks, pregnancy weight gain, women's self-efficacy and breastfeeding status at one month after birth and neonatal bone mineral content, assessed by DXA within the first 14 days after birth. This trial is evaluating two approaches to improving maternal diet: a behaviour change intervention and vitamin D supplementation. The factorial design of this trial has the advantage of enabling each intervention to be tested separately as well as allowing exploration of the synergistic effect of both interventions on women's diets and vitamin D levels. ISRCTN07227232 . Registered on 13 September 2013.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 180 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 180 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 29 16%
Student > Master 28 16%
Researcher 18 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 9%
Student > Postgraduate 9 5%
Other 31 17%
Unknown 49 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 37 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 32 18%
Social Sciences 13 7%
Psychology 11 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 4%
Other 25 14%
Unknown 54 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 October 2017.
All research outputs
#1,725,005
of 12,009,062 outputs
Outputs from Trials
#696
of 2,871 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#56,219
of 265,614 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Trials
#32
of 72 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,009,062 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,871 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,614 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 72 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.