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Zinc oxide enriched peat influence Escherichia coli infection related diarrhea, growth rates, serum and tissue zinc levels in Norwegian piglets around weaning: five case herd trials

Overview of attention for article published in Porcine Health Management, June 2017
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Title
Zinc oxide enriched peat influence Escherichia coli infection related diarrhea, growth rates, serum and tissue zinc levels in Norwegian piglets around weaning: five case herd trials
Published in
Porcine Health Management, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40813-017-0060-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

M. Oropeza-Moe, C.A. Grøntvedt, C.J. Phythian, H. Sørum, A.K. Fauske, T. Framstad

Abstract

Zinc oxide (ZnO), commonly used to control post-weaning diarrhea in piglets, has been highlighted as of potential concern from an environmental perspective. The aim of this field trial was to examine effects of different sources and levels of ZnO added to peat on average daily weight gain (ADG), fecal score in pens and serum and tissue zinc (Zn) levels around time of weaning in order to reduce the environmental impact without loss of the beneficial effect of ZnO on intestinal health and growth. Five case herds with enterotoxic colibacillosis challenges were included. The piglets entered the study aged three or five weeks. All piglets received a commercial diet containing <150 mg Zn/ per kg of complete feed. Four treatment groups received commercial peat added A: uncoated ZnO, B: lipid microencapsulated ZnO, C: solely commercial peat or D: no peat (Farms 2 and 3). At Farms 1, 2 and 3, a significant effect of treatment was identified for fecal score (P < 0.05). Treatment A led to lower fecal scores compared to treatments C (P < 0.05) and D (P < 0.01). At Farms 2 and 3, there was a significant difference in individual average daily weight gain (iADG) between treatment A and D (P < 0.05). The iADG of piglets receiving treatment B did not differ significantly from treatment A. In 2016, The European Medicines Agency's Committee on Veterinary Medicinal Products concluded that the benefits of ZnO for the prevention of diarrhea in pigs do not outweigh the risks to the environment. Effective alternative measures to reduce the accumulation of Zn in the environment have not been identified. Our results imply that peat added low concentration of both coated and uncoated ZnO influences the gut health of weaned piglets reflected by enhanced weight gain and reduced occurrence of diarrhea. This preventive approach certainly represents a favourable alternative in the "One Health" perspective. It will also contribute to reduced antibiotic use in pig farming while diminishing the environmental consequences caused by ZnO.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 36 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 17%
Student > Bachelor 5 14%
Researcher 5 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 8%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 9 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 8 22%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 13 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 July 2017.
All research outputs
#9,154,281
of 11,435,137 outputs
Outputs from Porcine Health Management
#41
of 47 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#189,102
of 259,699 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Porcine Health Management
#4
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,435,137 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 47 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.7. This one scored the same or higher as 6 of them.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 259,699 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.