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Comparative analysis of gut microbiota associated with body mass index in a large Korean cohort

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Microbiology, July 2017
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

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18 tweeters

Citations

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58 Dimensions

Readers on

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131 Mendeley
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2 CiteULike
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Title
Comparative analysis of gut microbiota associated with body mass index in a large Korean cohort
Published in
BMC Microbiology, July 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12866-017-1052-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yeojun Yun, Han-Na Kim, Song E. Kim, Seong Gu Heo, Yoosoo Chang, Seungho Ryu, Hocheol Shin, Hyung-Lae Kim

Abstract

Gut microbiota plays an important role in the harvesting, storage, and expenditure of energy obtained from one's diet. Our cross-sectional study aimed to identify differences in gut microbiota according to body mass index (BMI) in a Korean population. 16S rRNA gene sequence data from 1463 subjects were categorized by BMI into normal, overweight, and obese groups. Fecal microbiotas were compared to determine differences in diversity and functional inference analysis related with BMI. The correlation between genus-level microbiota and BMI was tested using zero-inflated Gaussian mixture models, with or without covariate adjustment of nutrient intake. We confirmed differences between 16Sr RNA gene sequencing data of each BMI group, with decreasing diversity in the obese compared with the normal group. According to analysis of inferred metagenomic functional content using PICRUSt algorithm, a highly significant discrepancy in metabolism and immune functions (P < 0.0001) was predicted in the obese group. Differential taxonomic components in each BMI group were greatly affected by nutrient adjustment, whereas signature bacteria were not influenced by nutrients in the obese compared with the overweight group. We found highly significant statistical differences between normal, overweight and obese groups using a large sample size with or without diet confounding factors. Our informative dataset sheds light on the epidemiological study on population microbiome.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 18 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 131 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 131 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 29 22%
Student > Bachelor 23 18%
Researcher 22 17%
Student > Master 17 13%
Student > Postgraduate 8 6%
Other 15 11%
Unknown 17 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 24 18%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 22 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 18 14%
Immunology and Microbiology 13 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 9%
Other 17 13%
Unknown 25 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 January 2018.
All research outputs
#1,646,521
of 12,390,159 outputs
Outputs from BMC Microbiology
#162
of 1,825 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#51,602
of 264,794 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Microbiology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,390,159 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,825 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,794 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them