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Effects of deployment on diet quality and nutritional status markers of elite U.S. Army special operations forces soldiers

Overview of attention for article published in Nutrition Journal, July 2017
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Title
Effects of deployment on diet quality and nutritional status markers of elite U.S. Army special operations forces soldiers
Published in
Nutrition Journal, July 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12937-017-0262-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Emily K. Farina, Jonathan C. Taylor, Gary E. Means, Nancy E. Murphy, Stefan M. Pasiakos, Harris R. Lieberman, James P. McClung

Abstract

Special Operations Forces (SOF) Soldiers deploy frequently and require high levels of physical and cognitive performance. Nutritional status is linked to cognitive and physical performance. Studies evaluating dietary intake and nutritional status in deployed environments are lacking. Therefore, this study assessed the effects of combat deployment on diet quality and serum concentrations of nutritional status markers, including iron, vitamin D, parathyroid hormone (PTH), glucose, and lipids, among elite United States (U.S.) Army SOF Soldiers. Changes from baseline to post-deployment were determined with a repeated measure within-subjects design for Healthy Eating Index-2010 (HEI-2010) scores, intake of foods, food groups, key nutrients, and serum nutritional status markers. Dietary intake was assessed with a Block Food Frequency Questionnaire. The association between post-deployment serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25-OH vitamin D) and PTH was determined. Analyses of serum markers were completed on 50 participants and analyses of dietary intake were completed on 33 participants. In response to deployment, HEI-2010 scores decreased for total HEI-2010 (70.3 ± 9.1 vs. 62.9 ± 11.1), total fruit (4.4 ± 1.1 vs. 3.7 ± 1.5), whole fruit (4.6 ± 1.0 vs. 4.2 ± 1.4), dairy (6.2 ± 2.7 vs. 4.8 ± 2.4), and empty calories (14.3 ± 3.2 vs. 11.1 ± 4.5) (P ≤ 0.05). Average daily intakes of foods and food groups that decreased included total dairy (P < 0.01), milk (P < 0.01), and non-juice fruit (P = 0.03). Dietary intake of calcium (P = 0.05) and vitamin D (P = 0.03) decreased. PTH increased from baseline (3.4 ± 1.6 vs. 3.8 ± 1.4 pmol/L, P = 0.04), while there was no change in 25-OH vitamin D. Ferritin decreased (385 ± 173 vs. 354 ± 161 pmol/L, P = 0.03) and soluble transferrin receptor increased (16.3 ± 3.7 vs. 17.1 ± 3.5 nmol/L, P = 0.01). There were no changes in glucose or lipids. Post-deployment, serum 25-OH vitamin D was inversely associated with PTH (r = -0.43, P < 0.01). HEI-2010 scores and dietary intake of milk, calcium, and vitamin D decreased following deployment. Serum PTH increased and iron stores were degraded. No Soldiers were iron deficient. Personnel that deploy frequently should maintain a high diet quality in the U.S. and while deployed by avoiding empty calories and consuming fruits, vegetables, and adequate sources of calcium, vitamin D, and iron. Improving availability and quality of perishable food during deployment may improve diet quality.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 57 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 57 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 12 21%
Student > Master 11 19%
Student > Postgraduate 3 5%
Lecturer 3 5%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 4%
Other 4 7%
Unknown 22 39%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 9%
Psychology 4 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 5%
Other 6 11%
Unknown 24 42%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 October 2017.
All research outputs
#11,125,460
of 18,665,750 outputs
Outputs from Nutrition Journal
#975
of 1,334 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#137,659
of 275,516 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nutrition Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,665,750 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,334 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 30.3. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,516 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them