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Gene expression profiling of whole blood cells supports a more efficient mitochondrial respiration in hypoxia-challenged gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata)

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Zoology, July 2017
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (53rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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27 Dimensions

Readers on

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58 Mendeley
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Title
Gene expression profiling of whole blood cells supports a more efficient mitochondrial respiration in hypoxia-challenged gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata)
Published in
Frontiers in Zoology, July 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12983-017-0220-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Juan Antonio Martos-Sitcha, Azucena Bermejo-Nogales, Josep Alvar Calduch-Giner, Jaume Pérez-Sánchez

Abstract

Acclimation to abiotic challenges, including decreases in O2 availability, requires physiological and anatomical phenotyping to accommodate the organism to the environmental conditions. The retention of a nucleus and functional mitochondria in mature fish red blood cells makes blood a promising tissue to analyse the transcriptome and metabolic responses of hypoxia-challenged fish in an integrative and non-invasive manner. Juvenile gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) were reared at 20-21 °C under normoxic conditions (> 85% O2 saturation) followed by exposure to a gradual decrease in water O2 concentration to 3.0 ppm (41-42% O2 saturation) for 24 h or 1.3 ppm (18-19% O2 saturation) for up to 4 h. Blood samples were collected at three different sampling points for haematological, biochemical and transcriptomic analysis. Blood physiological hallmarks remained almost unaltered at 3.0 ppm, but the haematocrit and circulating levels of haemoglobin, glucose and lactate were consistently increased when fish were maintained below the limiting oxygen saturation at 1.3 ppm. These findings were concurrent with an increase in total plasma antioxidant activity and plasma cortisol levels, whereas the opposite trend was observed for growth-promoting factors, such as insulin-like growth factor I. Additionally, gene expression profiling of whole blood cells revealed changes in upstream master regulators of mitochondria (pgcβ and nrf1), antioxidant enzymes (gpx1, gst3, and sod2), outer and inner membrane translocases (tom70, tom22, tim44, tim10, and tim9), components of the mitochondrial dynamics system (mfn2, miffb, miro1a, and miro2), apoptotic factors (aifm1), uncoupling proteins (ucp2) and oxidative enzymes of fatty acid β-oxidation (acca2, ech, and hadh), the tricarboxylic acid cycle (cs) and the oxidative phosphorylation pathway. The overall response is an extensive reduction in gene expression of almost all respiratory chain enzyme subunits of the five complexes, although mitochondrial-encoded catalytic subunits and nuclear-encoded regulatory subunits of Complex IV were primarily increased in hypoxic fish. Our results demonstrate the re-adjustment of mitochondrial machinery at transcriptional level to cope with a decreased basal metabolic rate, consistent with a low risk of oxidative stress, diminished aerobic ATP production and higher O2-carrying capacity. Taken together, these results suggest that whole blood cells can be used as a highly informative target tissue of metabolic condition.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 58 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 58 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 12 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 21%
Student > Bachelor 7 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 10%
Student > Master 5 9%
Other 5 9%
Unknown 11 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 31%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 16%
Environmental Science 3 5%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 3%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 3%
Other 6 10%
Unknown 18 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 July 2017.
All research outputs
#6,321,404
of 11,467,880 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Zoology
#284
of 425 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#115,531
of 258,680 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Zoology
#9
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,467,880 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 425 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.0. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 258,680 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.