↓ Skip to main content

PAT-H-MS coupled with laser microdissection to study histone post-translational modifications in selected cell populations from pathology samples

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Epigenetics, July 2017
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
12 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
26 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
PAT-H-MS coupled with laser microdissection to study histone post-translational modifications in selected cell populations from pathology samples
Published in
Clinical Epigenetics, July 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13148-017-0369-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Roberta Noberini, Rémi Longuespée, Cristina Richichi, Giancarlo Pruneri, Mark Kriegsmann, Giuliana Pelicci, Tiziana Bonaldi

Abstract

Aberrations in histone post-translational modifications (hPTMs) have been linked with various pathologies, including cancer, and could not only represent useful biomarkers but also suggest possible targetable epigenetic mechanisms. We have recently developed an approach, termed pathology tissue analysis of histones by mass spectrometry (PAT-H-MS), that allows performing a comprehensive and quantitative analysis of histone PTMs from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded pathology samples. Despite its great potential, the application of this technique is limited by tissue heterogeneity. In this study, we further implemented the PAT-H-MS approach by coupling it with techniques aimed at reducing sample heterogeneity and selecting specific portions or cell populations within the samples, such as manual macrodissection and laser microdissection (LMD). When applied to the analysis of a small set of breast cancer samples, LMD-PAT-H-MS allowed detecting more marked changes between luminal A-like and triple negative patients as compared with the classical approach. These changes included not only the already known H3 K27me3 and K9me3 marks, but also H3 K36me1, which was found increased in triple negative samples and validated on a larger cohort of patients, and could represent a potential novel marker distinguishing breast cancer subtypes. These results show the feasibility of applying techniques to reduce sample heterogeneity, including laser microdissection, to the PAT-H-MS protocol, providing new tools in clinical epigenetics and opening new avenues for the comprehensive analysis of histone post-translational modifications in selected cell populations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 26 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 19%
Other 4 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 8%
Other 3 12%
Unknown 7 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 27%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 12%
Computer Science 1 4%
Chemical Engineering 1 4%
Neuroscience 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 12 46%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 July 2017.
All research outputs
#10,176,055
of 11,467,880 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Epigenetics
#477
of 525 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#217,909
of 259,015 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Epigenetics
#19
of 26 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,467,880 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 525 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 259,015 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 26 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.