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Identification of developmental stage and anatomical fraction contributions to cell wall recalcitrance in switchgrass

Overview of attention for article published in Biotechnology for Biofuels, July 2017
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)
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2 tweeters

Citations

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23 Dimensions

Readers on

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29 Mendeley
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Title
Identification of developmental stage and anatomical fraction contributions to cell wall recalcitrance in switchgrass
Published in
Biotechnology for Biofuels, July 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13068-017-0870-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jacob D. Crowe, Nicholas Feringa, Sivakumar Pattathil, Brian Merritt, Cliff Foster, Dayna Dines, Rebecca G. Ong, David B. Hodge

Abstract

Heterogeneity within herbaceous biomass can present important challenges for processing feedstocks to cellulosic biofuels. Alterations to cell wall composition and organization during plant growth represent major contributions to heterogeneity within a single species or cultivar. To address this challenge, the focus of this study was to characterize the relationship between composition and properties of the plant cell wall and cell wall response to deconstruction by NaOH pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis for anatomical fractions (stem internodes, leaf sheaths, and leaf blades) within switchgrass at various tissue maturities as assessed by differing internode. Substantial differences in both cell wall composition and response to deconstruction were observed as a function of anatomical fraction and tissue maturity. Notably, lignin content increased with tissue maturity concurrently with decreasing ferulate content across all three anatomical fractions. Stem internodes exhibited the highest lignin content as well as the lowest hydrolysis yields, which were inversely correlated to lignin content. Confocal microscopy was used to demonstrate that removal of cell wall aromatics (i.e., lignins and hydroxycinnamates) by NaOH pretreatment was non-uniform across diverse cell types. Non-cellulosic polysaccharides were linked to differences in cell wall response to deconstruction in lower lignin fractions. Specifically, leaf sheath and leaf blade were found to have higher contents of substituted glucuronoarabinoxylans and pectic polysaccharides. Glycome profiling demonstrated that xylan and pectic polysaccharide extractability varied with stem internode maturity, with more mature internodes requiring harsher chemical extractions to remove comparable glycan abundances relative to less mature internodes. While enzymatic hydrolysis was performed on extractives-free biomass, extractible sugars (i.e., starch and sucrose) comprised a significant portion of total dry weight particularly in stem internodes, and may provide an opportunity for recovery during processing. Cell wall structural differences within a single plant can play a significant role in feedstock properties and have the potential to be exploited for improving biomass processability during a biorefining process. The results from this work demonstrate that cell wall lignin content, while generally exhibiting a negative correlation with enzymatic hydrolysis yields, is not the sole contributor to cell wall recalcitrance across diverse anatomical fractions within switchgrass.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 29 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 29 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 14%
Student > Master 3 10%
Student > Bachelor 2 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 7%
Other 4 14%
Unknown 10 34%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 21%
Materials Science 4 14%
Engineering 3 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%
Other 4 14%
Unknown 10 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 July 2017.
All research outputs
#6,184,598
of 11,489,354 outputs
Outputs from Biotechnology for Biofuels
#393
of 879 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#110,845
of 258,844 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biotechnology for Biofuels
#14
of 28 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,489,354 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 879 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 258,844 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 28 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.