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Diagnosing allergic sensitizations in the third millennium: why clinicians should know allergen molecule structures

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical and Translational Allergy, July 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#10 of 535)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
56 tweeters
facebook
7 Facebook pages
googleplus
2 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
30 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
42 Mendeley
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Title
Diagnosing allergic sensitizations in the third millennium: why clinicians should know allergen molecule structures
Published in
Clinical and Translational Allergy, July 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13601-017-0158-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

C. Alessandri, R. Ferrara, M. L. Bernardi, D. Zennaro, L. Tuppo, I. Giangrieco, M. Tamburrini, A. Mari, M. A. Ciardiello

Abstract

Diagnostic tests to detect allergic sensitization were introduced at the end of the nineteenth century but only in the late 1990s did the advent of molecular allergology revolutionize the approach to the allergic patient. Personalized Medicine, a medical procedure that separates patients into different groups with different medical decisions, practices and interventions has sanctioned this change. In fact, in the last few years molecular allergology and the observation that not every patient has the same allergic profile, even when allergic to the same allergenic source, has originated the concept "one size does not fit all". This new approach requires the identification of still unknown allergens, but also the more detailed investigation of those already known. In depth studies of the structure-function relationships in allergenic molecules can reveal the structural determinants involved in the IgE-binding. Then, the knowledge of the epitope profile of each allergen and of the environmental/experimental conditions affecting the exposure of IgE-binding epitopes can provide important contributions to the understanding of cross-reaction processes and to the improvement of diagnosis, immunotherapy and the overall patient treatment. The evolution of diagnostic systems cannot ignore these new needs in this field.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 56 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 42 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 19%
Other 4 10%
Student > Bachelor 4 10%
Lecturer 3 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 7%
Other 11 26%
Unknown 9 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 24%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 12%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 7%
Arts and Humanities 2 5%
Other 4 10%
Unknown 11 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 39. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 January 2018.
All research outputs
#688,002
of 18,438,151 outputs
Outputs from Clinical and Translational Allergy
#10
of 535 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15,001
of 222,103 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical and Translational Allergy
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,438,151 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 535 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 222,103 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them