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Lifestyle impact and the biology of the human scrotum

Overview of attention for article published in Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology, April 2007
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#42 of 820)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
114 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
74 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Lifestyle impact and the biology of the human scrotum
Published in
Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology, April 2007
DOI 10.1186/1477-7827-5-15
Pubmed ID
Authors

Richard Ivell

Abstract

The possession of a scrotum to contain the male gonads is a characteristic feature of almost all mammals, and appears to have evolved to allow the testes and epididymis to be exposed to a temperature a few degrees below that of core body temperature. Analysis of cryptorchid patients, and those with varicocele suggest that mild scrotal warming can be detrimental to sperm production, partly by effects on the stem cell population, and partly by effects on later stages of spermatogenesis and sperm maturation. Recent studies on the effects of clothing and lifestyle emphasize that these can also lead to chronically elevated scrotal temperatures. In particular, the wearing of nappies by infants is a cause for concern in this regard. Together all of the evidence indirectly supports the view that lifestyle factors in addition to other genetic and environmental influences could be contributing to the secular trend in declining male reproductive parameters. The challenge will be to provide relevant and targeted experimental results to support or refute the currently circumstantial evidence.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 74 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 3%
Mexico 1 1%
Japan 1 1%
Unknown 70 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 16%
Student > Bachelor 9 12%
Other 8 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 11%
Researcher 7 9%
Other 15 20%
Unknown 15 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 22%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 20%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 9%
Unspecified 3 4%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 3%
Other 11 15%
Unknown 20 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 26. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 November 2021.
All research outputs
#1,067,947
of 19,856,719 outputs
Outputs from Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology
#42
of 820 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#12,387
of 202,833 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,856,719 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 820 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 202,833 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them