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Time-restricted feeding and the realignment of biological rhythms: translational opportunities and challenges

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Translational Medicine, March 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

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32 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
115 Mendeley
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Title
Time-restricted feeding and the realignment of biological rhythms: translational opportunities and challenges
Published in
Journal of Translational Medicine, March 2014
DOI 10.1186/1479-5876-12-79
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jag Sunderram, Stavroula Sofou, Kubra Kamisoglu, Vassiliki Karantza, Ioannis P Androulakis

Abstract

It has been argued that circadian dysregulation is not only a critical inducer and promoter of adverse health effects, exacerbating symptom burden, but also hampers recovery. Therefore understanding the health-promoting roles of regulating (i.e., restoring) circadian rhythms, thus suppressing harmful effects of circadian dysregulation, would likely improve treatment. At a critical care setting it has been argued that studies are warranted to determine whether there is any use in restoring circadian rhythms in critically ill patients, what therapeutic goals should be targeted, and how these could be achieved. Particularly interesting are interventional approaches aiming at optimizing the time of feeding in relation to individualized day-night cycles for patients receiving enteral nutrition, in an attempt to re-establish circadian patterns of molecular expression. In this short review we wish to explore the idea of transiently imposing (appropriate, but yet to be determined) circadian rhythmicity via regulation of food intake as a means of exploring rhythm-setting properties of metabolic cues in the context of improving immune response. We highlight some of the key elements associated with his complex question particularly as they relate to: a) stress and rhythmic variability; and b) metabolic entrainment of peripheral tissues as a possible intervention strategy through time-restricted feeding. Finally, we discuss the challenges and opportunities for translating these ideas to the bedside.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 115 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 2%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Unknown 110 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 17%
Student > Master 17 15%
Student > Bachelor 17 15%
Researcher 11 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 7%
Other 24 21%
Unknown 18 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 27 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 18 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 10%
Neuroscience 5 4%
Other 17 15%
Unknown 24 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 March 2021.
All research outputs
#2,405,795
of 19,502,191 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Translational Medicine
#371
of 3,442 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#26,948
of 201,790 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Translational Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,502,191 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,442 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 201,790 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them