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Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in an adult human population: serial observations from the multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (Taylor & Francis Ltd), July 2017
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

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31 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages

Citations

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26 Dimensions

Readers on

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49 Mendeley
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Title
Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in an adult human population: serial observations from the multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis
Published in
Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (Taylor & Francis Ltd), July 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12968-017-0367-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kihei Yoneyama, Bharath A. Venkatesh, David A. Bluemke, Robyn L. McClelland, João A.C. Lima

Abstract

The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) is the first large-scale multi-ethnic population study in the U.S. to use advanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging. MESA participants were free of cardiovascular disease at baseline between 2000 and 2002, and were followed up between 2009 and 2011 with repeated CMR examinations as part of MESA. CMR allows the clinician to visualize and accurately quantify volume and dimensions of all four cardiac chambers; measure systolic and diastolic ventricular function; assess myocardial fibrosis; assess vessel lumen size, vessel wall morphology, and vessel stiffness. CMR has a number of advantages over other imaging modalities such as echocardiography, computed tomography, and invasive angiography, and has been proposed as a diagnostic strategy for high-risk populations. MESA has been extensively evaluating CMR imaging biomarkers, as markers of subclinical disease, in the last 15 years for low-risk populations. On a more practical level, some of the imaging biomarkers developed and studied are translatable to at-risk populations. In this review, we discuss the progression of subclinical cardiovascular disease and the mechanisms responsible for the transition to symptomatic clinical outcomes based on our findings from MESA.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 31 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 49 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 22%
Researcher 11 22%
Student > Master 6 12%
Student > Bachelor 4 8%
Other 3 6%
Other 9 18%
Unknown 5 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 24 49%
Engineering 7 14%
Computer Science 3 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 4%
Other 3 6%
Unknown 8 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 18. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 October 2017.
All research outputs
#1,470,186
of 19,549,916 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (Taylor & Francis Ltd)
#58
of 1,180 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#33,099
of 281,031 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (Taylor & Francis Ltd)
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,549,916 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,180 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 281,031 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them