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Effectiveness of three modes of kinetic-chain exercises on quadriceps muscle strength and thigh girth among individuals with knee osteoarthritis

Overview of attention for article published in Archives of Physiotherapy, July 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (64th percentile)

Mentioned by

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7 tweeters

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

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65 Mendeley
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Title
Effectiveness of three modes of kinetic-chain exercises on quadriceps muscle strength and thigh girth among individuals with knee osteoarthritis
Published in
Archives of Physiotherapy, July 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40945-017-0036-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Oladapo Michael Olagbegi, Babatunde Olusola Adegoke, Adesola Christiana Odole

Abstract

The study was designed to evaluate and compare the effectiveness of 12-week open, closed and combined kinetic-chain exercises (OKCE, CKCE and CCE) on quadriceps muscle strength and thigh girth of patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). The randomized clinical trial involved ninety-six consecutive patients with knee OA who were randomly assigned to one of OKCE, CKCE or CCE groups. Participants' static quadriceps muscle strength (SQS), dynamic quadriceps muscle strength (DQS) and thigh girth (TG) were assessed using cable tensiometer, one repetition method and inelastic tape measure respectively at baseline and at the end of weeks 4, 8 and 12 of study. The three groups were comparable regarding their demographic and dependent variables at baseline; there was significant time effect (p < 0.001each) as all three measures significantly increased over time from baseline to week 12 [mean difference: SQS: 3.30 (95% CI: 2.52-4.08) N; DQS: 0.74 (95% CI: 0.45-1.02) N; TG: 1.32 (95% CI: 0.93-1.71) cm]. The effect of intervention-time interaction was not significant (p > 0.05) for all three measures. Changes in SQS, DQS and TG between baseline and week 12 were also not significantly different (p > 0.05) among the three groups. All three exercise regimens are effective and demonstrate similar effects on quadriceps muscle strength and muscular trophism. NHREC/05/01/2008a. Registered 20th March, 2014 Retrospectively.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 65 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 65 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 20 31%
Student > Master 8 12%
Student > Postgraduate 4 6%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 2 3%
Other 2 3%
Other 5 8%
Unknown 24 37%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 18 28%
Sports and Recreations 6 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 3%
Engineering 2 3%
Other 3 5%
Unknown 28 43%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 November 2018.
All research outputs
#4,146,219
of 13,906,652 outputs
Outputs from Archives of Physiotherapy
#28
of 55 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#94,593
of 266,512 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Archives of Physiotherapy
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,906,652 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 69th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 55 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.8. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,512 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them