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Factors associated with increased pancreatic enzymes in septic patients: a prospective study

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Intensive Care, July 2017
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Title
Factors associated with increased pancreatic enzymes in septic patients: a prospective study
Published in
Journal of Intensive Care, July 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40560-017-0243-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anis Chaari, Karim Abdel Hakim, Nevine Rashed, Kamel Bousselmi, Vipin Kauts, Mahmoud Etman, William Francis Casey

Abstract

The perfusion of splanchnic organs is deeply altered in patients with septic shock. The aim of the study is to identify the predictive factors of septic shock-induced increase of serum lipase and amylase and to assess and evaluate its prognostic impact. We conducted a prospective observational study. All adult patients admitted with septic shock were eligible for our study. Serum lipase and amylase were measured on admission. Patients with and those without increased pancreatic enzymes were compared. Predictive factors of pancreatic insult identified by the univariate analysis were integrated in a stepwise multivariate analysis. Odds ratios (OR) with the 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated accordingly. Second, the sensitivity and the specificity of amylase and lipase to predict intensive care unit (ICU) mortality were identified through the Receiver Operator Curve. Fifty patients were included. Median [quartiles] age was 68.5 [58-81] years. The APACHE II score was 26 [20-31]. Twenty-three patients (46%) had increased serum amylase and/or serum lipase. Diabetes mellitus (OR = 16; 95% CI [1.7-153.5]; p = 0.016), increased blood urea nitrogen (OR = 1.12; 95% CI [1.02-1.20], p = 0.016), and decreased C-reactive protein (OR = 0.97; 95% CI [0.96-0.99]; p = 0.027) were identified as independent factors predicting increased pancreatic enzymes. Twenty patients (40%) died in the ICU. Neither serum amylase level nor serum lipase level was significantly different between survivors and non-survivors (respectively 49 [27.7-106] versus 85.1 [20.1-165] UI/L; p = 0.7 and 165 [88-316] versus 120 [65.5-592] UI/L; p = 0.952). Increase of pancreatic enzymes is common in patients with septic shock. Diabetes and impaired renal function are predictive of increased pancreatic enzymes. Such finding does not carry any negative prognostic value.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 17 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 4 24%
Other 3 18%
Student > Master 3 18%
Professor 1 6%
Student > Bachelor 1 6%
Other 2 12%
Unknown 3 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 35%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 18%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 6%
Other 2 12%
Unknown 3 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 July 2017.
All research outputs
#10,213,830
of 11,511,689 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Intensive Care
#222
of 236 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#221,457
of 262,616 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Intensive Care
#21
of 21 outputs
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