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Low cigarette smoking prevalence in peri-urban Peru: results from a population-based study of tobacco use by self-report and urine cotinine

Overview of attention for article published in Tobacco Induced Diseases, July 2017
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2 tweeters

Citations

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8 Dimensions

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30 Mendeley
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Title
Low cigarette smoking prevalence in peri-urban Peru: results from a population-based study of tobacco use by self-report and urine cotinine
Published in
Tobacco Induced Diseases, July 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12971-017-0137-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Brooks W. Morgan, Kathryn M. Leifheit, Karina M. Romero, Robert H. Gilman, Antonio Bernabe-Ortiz, J. Jaime Miranda, Harold I. Feldman, John J. Lima, William Checkley

Abstract

A recent study found lower self-reported prevalence of tobacco smoking in a peri-urban area of Lima, Peru than previously reported in urban samples. These regions encompass substantial proportions of Peru's population - ones at greater risk of disease due to reduced healthcare access - but have been less often studied. We validate low smoking prevalence with urine cotinine and characterize chronic disease and lung function outcomes between non-, occasional, and daily smokers. Data are from the CRONICAS Cohort Study, a population-based longitudinal study in four low-resource Peruvian settings, which began in 2010. Of a baseline cohort of 2978 adults, we prospectively followed 2583 (87%) to determine prevalence of chronic illness. In a baseline sub-sample of 382 participants, median adjusted cotinine was 0.0 mcg/mg (IQR 0-0) for both self-reported non-smokers and occasional smokers compared to 172.3 mcg/mg (IQR 0-709.2) for daily smokers. Creatinine-adjusted cotinine validated daily smoking prevalence of 4.7% at a cutoff of 100 mcg/mg. Kappa statistic for daily smoking and creatinine- adjusted cotinine ≥100 mcg/mg was 0.65 (95% CI 0.47, 0.83), indicating substantial agreement. At baseline, we found 3.3% daily and 8.9% occasional smoking by self-report for the full cohort. Follow-up indicated little difference in chronic disease prevalence between groups. Daily smokers trended toward having a greater decline in FVC (-1%; 95% CI -2.9, 0.8) and FEV1 (-1.3%; 95% CI -3.2, 0.6) over 40 months when compared to non-smokers, whereas the decline in lung function for occasional smokers was similar compared to non-smokers (-0.2% FVC; 95% CI -1.5, 1.0) and (0% FEV1; 95% CI -1.3, 1.3). Our data places Peru within a previously-described pattern of smoking found in much of Latin America, favoring occasional over daily smoking and low cigarette consumption. We determine that there are not significant differences between smoking groups concerning chronic disease outcomes. We favor distinguishing between daily and occasional smokers in order to accurately characterize these low-use populations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 30 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 10%
Student > Bachelor 2 7%
Other 2 7%
Student > Postgraduate 2 7%
Researcher 2 7%
Other 6 20%
Unknown 13 43%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 20%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 7%
Arts and Humanities 1 3%
Environmental Science 1 3%
Mathematics 1 3%
Other 5 17%
Unknown 14 47%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 July 2017.
All research outputs
#7,833,517
of 13,586,571 outputs
Outputs from Tobacco Induced Diseases
#105
of 195 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#132,593
of 266,607 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Tobacco Induced Diseases
#4
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,586,571 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 195 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.8. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,607 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.