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The effects of acute and elective cardiac surgery on the anxiety traits of patients with Marfan syndrome

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychiatry, July 2017
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Title
The effects of acute and elective cardiac surgery on the anxiety traits of patients with Marfan syndrome
Published in
BMC Psychiatry, July 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12888-017-1417-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kálmán Benke, Bence Ágg, Miklós Pólos, Alex Ali Sayour, Tamás Radovits, Elektra Bartha, Péter Nagy, Balázs Rákóczi, Ákos Koller, Viola Szokolai, Julianna Hedberg, Béla Merkely, Zsolt B. Nagy, Zoltán Szabolcs

Abstract

Marfan syndrome is a genetic disease, presenting with dysfunction of connective tissues leading to lesions in the cardiovascular and skeletal muscle system. Within these symptoms, the most typical is weakness of the connective tissue in the aorta, manifesting as aortic dilatation (aneurysm). This could, in turn, become annuloaortic ectasia, or life-threatening dissection. As a result, life-saving and preventative cardiac surgical interventions are frequent among Marfan syndrome patients. Aortic aneurysm could turn into annuloaortic ectasia or life-threatening dissection, thus life-saving and preventive cardiac surgical interventions are frequent among patients with Marfan syndrome. We hypothesized that patients with Marfan syndrome have different level of anxiety, depression and satisfaction with life compared to that of the non-clinical patient population. Patients diagnosed with Marfan syndrome were divided into 3 groups: those scheduled for prophylactic surgery, those needing acute surgery, and those without need for surgery (n = 9, 19, 17, respectively). To examine the psychological features of the patients, Spielberger's anxiety (STAI) test, Beck's Depression questionnaire (BDI), the Berne Questionnaire of Subjective Well-being, and the Satisfaction with Life scale were applied. A significant difference was found in trait anxiety between healthy individuals and patients with Marfan syndrome after acute life-saving surgery (p < 0.01). The mean score of Marfan syndrome patients was 48.56 (standard deviation (SD): 5.8) as compared to the STAI population mean score of 43.72 (SD: 8.53). No difference was found between groups on the BDI (p > 0.1). Finally, a significant, medium size effect was found between patient groups on the Joy in Living scale (F (2.39) = 3.51, p = 0.040, η(2) = 0.15). Involving psychiatric and mental-health care, in addition to existing surgical treatment interventions, is essential for more successful recovery of patients with Marfan syndrome.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 48 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 19%
Student > Bachelor 6 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 10%
Student > Postgraduate 4 8%
Other 4 8%
Other 9 19%
Unknown 11 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 29%
Psychology 10 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 8%
Neuroscience 3 6%
Sports and Recreations 1 2%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 15 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 September 2017.
All research outputs
#9,365,513
of 11,717,557 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychiatry
#2,245
of 2,723 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#195,153
of 267,179 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychiatry
#94
of 108 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,717,557 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,723 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.4. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 108 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.