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Longitudinal genomic surveillance of multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli carriage in a long-term care facility in the United Kingdom

Overview of attention for article published in Genome Medicine, July 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
39 tweeters

Citations

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32 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
92 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
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Title
Longitudinal genomic surveillance of multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli carriage in a long-term care facility in the United Kingdom
Published in
Genome Medicine, July 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13073-017-0457-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hayley J. Brodrick, Kathy E. Raven, Teemu Kallonen, Dorota Jamrozy, Beth Blane, Nicholas M. Brown, Veronique Martin, M. Estée Török, Julian Parkhill, Sharon J. Peacock

Abstract

Residents of long-term care facilities (LTCF) may have high carriage rates of multidrug-resistant pathogens, but are not currently included in surveillance programmes for antimicrobial resistance or healthcare-associated infections. Here, we describe the value derived from a longitudinal epidemiological and genomic surveillance study of drug-resistant Escherichia coli in a LTCF in the United Kingdom (UK). Forty-five of 90 (50%) residents were recruited and followed for six months in 2014. Participants were screened weekly for carriage of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing E. coli. Participants positive for ESBL E. coli were also screened for ESBL-negative E. coli. Phenotypic antibiotic susceptibility of E. coli was determined using the Vitek2 instrument and isolates were sequenced on an Illumina HiSeq2000 instrument. Information was collected on episodes of clinical infection and antibiotic consumption. Seventeen of 45 participants (38%) carried ESBL E. coli. Twenty-three of the 45 participants (51%) had 63 documented episodes of clinical infection treated with antibiotics. Treatment with antibiotics was associated with higher risk of carrying ESBL E. coli. ESBL E. coli was mainly sequence type (ST)131 (16/17, 94%). Non-ESBL E. coli from these 17 cases was more genetically diverse, but ST131 was found in eight (47%) cases. Whole-genome analysis of 297 ST131 E. coli from the 17 cases demonstrated highly related strains from six participants, indicating acquisition from a common source or person-to-person transmission. Five participants carried highly related strains of both ESBL-positive and ESBL-negative ST131. Genome-based comparison of ST131 isolates from the LTCF study participants with ST131 associated with bloodstream infection at a nearby acute hospital and in hospitals across England revealed sharing of highly related lineages between the LTCF and a local hospital. This study demonstrates the power of genomic surveillance to detect multidrug-resistant pathogens and confirm their connectivity within a healthcare network.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 39 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 92 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 92 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 18 20%
Researcher 15 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 14%
Student > Bachelor 10 11%
Other 5 5%
Other 12 13%
Unknown 19 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 21 23%
Immunology and Microbiology 13 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 12 13%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 2%
Other 8 9%
Unknown 24 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 21. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 October 2017.
All research outputs
#1,372,481
of 21,358,901 outputs
Outputs from Genome Medicine
#298
of 1,356 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#29,538
of 288,724 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genome Medicine
#1
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,358,901 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,356 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 288,724 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them