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Malaria rapid diagnostic test transport and storage conditions in Burkina Faso, Senegal, Ethiopia and the Philippines

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, December 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet

Citations

dimensions_citation
38 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
99 Mendeley
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Title
Malaria rapid diagnostic test transport and storage conditions in Burkina Faso, Senegal, Ethiopia and the Philippines
Published in
Malaria Journal, December 2012
DOI 10.1186/1475-2875-11-406
Pubmed ID
Authors

Audrey Albertini, Evan Lee, Sheick Oumar Coulibaly, Markos Sleshi, Babacar Faye, Mary Lorraine Mationg, Kadi Ouedraogo, Abeba G Tsadik, Sendeaw Maksha Feleke, Ibrahima Diallo, Oumar Gaye, Jennifer Luchavez, Jessica Bennett, David Bell

Abstract

As more point of care diagnostics become available, the need to transport and store perishable medical commodities to remote locations increases. As with other diagnostics, malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) must be highly reliable at point of use, but exposure to adverse environmental conditions during distribution has the potential to degrade tests and accuracy. In remote locations, poor quality diagnostics and drugs may have significant negative health impact that is not readily detectable by routine monitoring. This study assessed temperature and humidity throughout supply chains used to transport and store health commodities, such as RDTs.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 99 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 2%
Burkina Faso 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Belgium 1 1%
Unknown 94 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 24%
Researcher 17 17%
Student > Master 13 13%
Other 6 6%
Student > Bachelor 6 6%
Other 19 19%
Unknown 14 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 22 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 16 16%
Engineering 8 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 6%
Social Sciences 6 6%
Other 23 23%
Unknown 18 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 April 2014.
All research outputs
#396,683
of 3,661,940 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#133
of 1,333 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#11,943
of 89,084 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#6
of 89 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 3,661,940 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,333 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 89,084 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 89 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.