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A prospective study on ambulatory care provided by primary care pediatricians during influenza season

Overview of attention for article published in Italian Journal of Pediatrics, April 2014
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1 tweeter

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

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31 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
A prospective study on ambulatory care provided by primary care pediatricians during influenza season
Published in
Italian Journal of Pediatrics, April 2014
DOI 10.1186/1824-7288-40-38
Pubmed ID
Authors

Antonietta Giannattasio, Andrea Lo Vecchio, Carmen Napolitano, Laura Di Florio, Alfredo Guarino

Abstract

Aim of this study was to obtain a picture of the nature of the primary care pediatricians' visits during a winter season. We investigated reasons for visits, diagnosis, and pattern of prescription in 284 children. The reason for visit was a planned visit in 54% of cases, a well-being examination in 26%, and an urgent visit for an acute problem in 20% of cases. Cough was the most common symptom reported (61%). The most common pediatricians' diagnosis was flu-like syndrome (47%). No disease was found by pediatrician in 27% of children with a symptom reported by caregivers. Antibiotics were prescribed in 25% of children, the vast majority of which affected by viral respiratory infections. The unjustified access to physician's visit may lead to a inappropriate prescription of drugs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 31 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 29%
Student > Bachelor 4 13%
Researcher 4 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 10%
Other 2 6%
Other 7 23%
Unknown 2 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 19 61%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 13%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 3%
Other 3 10%
Unknown 2 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 April 2014.
All research outputs
#17,262,387
of 21,360,407 outputs
Outputs from Italian Journal of Pediatrics
#574
of 856 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#146,912
of 205,328 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Italian Journal of Pediatrics
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,360,407 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 856 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.6. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 205,328 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them