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The first data on the innervation of the lophophore in the rhynchonelliform brachiopod Hemithiris psittacea: what is the ground pattern of the lophophore in lophophorates?

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, July 2017
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
2 tweeters
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages

Citations

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18 Dimensions

Readers on

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12 Mendeley
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Title
The first data on the innervation of the lophophore in the rhynchonelliform brachiopod Hemithiris psittacea: what is the ground pattern of the lophophore in lophophorates?
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, July 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12862-017-1029-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elena N. Temereva, Tatyana V. Kuzmina

Abstract

The nervous system in brachiopods has seldom been studied with modern methods. An understanding of lophophore innervation in adult brachiopods is useful for comparing the innervation of the same lophophore type among different brachiopods and can also help answer questions about the monophyly of the lophophorates. Although some brachiopods are studied with modern methods, rhynchonelliform brachiopods still require investigation. The current study used transmission electron microscopy, immunocytochemistry, and confocal laser scanning microscopy to investigate the nerve system of the lophophore and tentacles in the rhynchonelliform Hemithiris psittacea. Four longitudinal nerves pass along each brachium of the lophophore: the main, accessory, second accessory, and lower. The main brachial nerve extends at the base of the dorsal side of the brachial fold and gives rise to the cross nerves, passing through the extracellular matrix to the tentacles. Cross nerves skirt the accessory brachial nerve, branch, and penetrate into adjacent outer and inner tentacles, where they are referred to as the frontal tentacular nerves. The second accessory nerve passes along the base of the inner tentacles. This nerve consists of Ʊ-like parts, which repetitively skirt the frontal and lateral sides of the inner tentacle and the frontal sides of the outer tentacles. The second accessory nerve gives rise to the latero-frontal nerves of the inner and outer tentacles. The abfrontal nerves of the inner tentacles also originate from the second accessory nerve, whereas the abfrontal nerves of the outer tentacles originate from the lower brachial nerve. The lower brachial nerve extends along the outer side of the lophophore brachia and gives rise to the intertentacular nerves, which form a T-like branch and penetrate the adjacent outer tentacles where they are referred to as abfrontal nerves. The paired outer radial nerves start from the lower brachial nerve, extend into the second accessory nerve, and give rise to the lateroabfrontal tentacular nerves of the outer tentacles. The innervation of the lophophore in the rhynchonelliform Hemithiris psittacea differs from that in the inarticulate Lingula anatina in several ways. The accessory brachial nerve does not participate in the innervation of the tentacles in H. psittacea as it does in L. anatina. The second accessory nerve is present in H. psittacea but not in L. anatina. There are six tentacular nerves in the outer tentacles of H. psittacea but only four in all other brachiopods studied to date. The reduced contribution of the accessory brachial nerve to tentacle innervation may reflect the general pattern of reduction of the inner lophophoral nerve in both phoronids and brachiopods. Bryozoan lophophores, in contrast, have a weakened outer nerve and a strengthened inner nerve. Our results suggest that the ancestral lophophore of all lophophorates had a simple shape but many nerve elements.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 12 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 2 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 17%
Student > Bachelor 2 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Unknown 3 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 25%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 17%
Unspecified 1 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 8%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 2 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 42. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 May 2018.
All research outputs
#375,939
of 12,974,406 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#94
of 2,435 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15,607
of 265,079 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,974,406 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,435 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,079 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them