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Evaluation of automated systems for aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones susceptibility testing for Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae

Overview of attention for article published in Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control, August 2017
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (62nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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12 Dimensions

Readers on

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24 Mendeley
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Title
Evaluation of automated systems for aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones susceptibility testing for Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae
Published in
Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control, August 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13756-017-0235-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Zhichang Zhao, Fangjun Lan, Maobai Liu, Weiyuan Chen, Liya Huang, Qili Lin, Bin Li, Zhao, Zhichang, Lan, Fangjun, Liu, Maobai, Chen, Weiyuan, Huang, Liya, Lin, Qili, Li, Bin

Abstract

Automated systems (MicroScan WalkAway 96 Plus, Phoenix 100, and Vitek 2 Compact) are widely used in clinical laboratories nowadays. The aim of this study is to evaluate the performance of these three systems for susceptibility testing of aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones against Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE). A total of 75 CRE isolates were used in this study. Quinolone resistance determinants (QRDs) (qnrA, qnrB, qnrC, qnrD, qnrS, aac(6')-Ib-cr, oqxAB and qepA) and aminoglycoside resistance determinants (ARDs) (aac(6')-Ib, armA, npmA, rmtA, rmtB, rmtC, rmtD and rmtE) of these CRE were screened by PCR. The MICs of aminoglycosides (gentamicin and amikacin) and fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin) to CRE obtained with the automated systems were compared with the reference method (agar dilution method). Totally, 97.3% (73/75) of CRE harbored QRDs. The qnr gene was the most common QRD determinant identified in 68 (96.7%), followed by aac (6')-Ib-cr in 56 (74.7%), oqxAB in 23 (30.7%), and qepA in 2 (2.7%), respectively. 22.7% (17/75) of CRE harbored ARD determinants. rmtA, rmtB and npmA were identified among these isolates in 6 (8.0%), 6 (8.0%) and 5 (6.7%), respectively. A total of 900 results were obtained in this study. Overall, the total error rate was 9.89%. Twenty-eight very major errors (3.11%), 22 major errors (2.44%) and 39 minor errors (4.33%) were identified against agar dilution method. The very major errors were almost evenly distributed between results for fluoroquinolones (2.89%) and aminoglycosides (3.33%), while the major errors and minor errors were more commonly found in the results of fluoroquinolones (3.11% and 6.44%, respectively) than aminoglycosides (1.78% and 2.22%, respectively). Our study shows that testing difficulties in susceptibility testing do exist in automated systems. We suggest clinical laboratories using automated systems should consider using a second, independent antimicrobial susceptibility testing method to validate aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones susceptibility.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 24 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 8%
Student > Master 2 8%
Professor 2 8%
Other 1 4%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 9 38%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Immunology and Microbiology 4 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 8%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 4%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 11 46%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 August 2017.
All research outputs
#5,275,290
of 17,787,078 outputs
Outputs from Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control
#522
of 1,028 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#92,723
of 279,319 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control
#4
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,787,078 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,028 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.6. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 279,319 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.