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Dietary variables associated with substantial postpartum weight retention at 1-year among women with GDM pregnancy

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Obesity, August 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#33 of 182)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 news outlet
twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

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15 Dimensions

Readers on

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61 Mendeley
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Title
Dietary variables associated with substantial postpartum weight retention at 1-year among women with GDM pregnancy
Published in
BMC Obesity, August 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40608-017-0166-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jaimie N. Davis, Grace E. Shearrer, Wei Tao, Shanta R. Hurston, Erica P. Gunderson

Abstract

An understanding of the dietary behaviors linked to substantial postpartum weight retention, particularly in women diagnosed with gestational diabetes (GDM), is warranted to focus intervention efforts to prevent future type 2 diabetes. This study evaluates the relationship between dietary food intake at 6-9 weeks postpartum (baseline) and odds of substantial postpartum weight retention (≥ 5 kg) at 1-year in women with GDM. The Study of Women, Infant Feeding and Type 2 Diabetes after GDM pregnancy (SWIFT) is a prospective multi-ethnic cohort (75% minority) of 1035 women (aged 20-45 years) with recent GDM who delivered a singleton, live birth (≥35 weeks gestation) and underwent 2-h 75 g OGTTs, anthropometric measurements and other assessments at 6-9 weeks postpartum (baseline) and annually thereafter. Eight hundred and eighty-eight women without diabetes at baseline completed the 18-item PrimeScreen to assess dietary intake and the 13-item Caffeine Survey to assess beverage intake, and completed 1-year follow-up. Average postpartum weight retention was calculated (1-year postpartum weight minus pre-pregnancy weight). Multivariable logistic regression models that estimated baseline dietary intake and odds of substantial postpartum weight retention (SPPWR ≥5 kg above pre-pregnancy weight) versus not SPPWR adjusted for numerous clinical, sociodemographic and behavioral covariates. Compared to eating no fried foods, women who reported eating fried foods ≥5 servings/wk. (n = 32) and 2-4 serv/wk. (n = 208), respectively, had a three-fold and two-fold higher odds of SPPWR (OR = 3.38, 95% CI:1.36-8.38, P = 0.009; OR = 1.99, 95% CI:1.30-3.03, P = 0.02), after adjustment for covariates and other foods and soda intake. Soda intake ≥2 serv/wk. versus none was associated with higher odds of SPPWR (OR = 1.95, 95% CI:1.22-3.11, P = 0.005) adjusted for fried foods and covariates, but was attenuated (OR = 1.61,95% CI:0.98-2.66, p = 0.06) after addition of whole eggs and processed meats. These findings indicate that interventions should focus on reducing fried foods and soda intake during early postpartum periods to reduce substantial postpartum weight retention in high-risk women with GDM. NCT01967030; October 2013, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Health and Human Development (NICHD).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 61 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 61 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 14 23%
Student > Master 11 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 5%
Other 6 10%
Unknown 16 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 23%
Psychology 7 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 5%
Computer Science 2 3%
Other 9 15%
Unknown 21 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 October 2019.
All research outputs
#1,715,773
of 15,964,324 outputs
Outputs from BMC Obesity
#33
of 182 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#43,223
of 273,231 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Obesity
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,964,324 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 182 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,231 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them