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The relationship of primary care providers to dental practitioners in rural and remote Australia

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, August 2017
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1 tweeter

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Title
The relationship of primary care providers to dental practitioners in rural and remote Australia
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, August 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12913-017-2473-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tony Barnett, Ha Hoang, Jackie Stuart, Len Crocombe

Abstract

Rural residents have poorer oral health and more limited access to dental services than their city counterparts. In rural communities, health care professionals often work in an extended capacity due to the needs of the community and health workforce shortages in these areas. Improved links and greater collaboration between resident rural primary care and dental practitioners could help improve oral health service provision such that interventions are both timely, effective and lead to appropriate follow-up and referral. This study examined the impact oral health problems had on primary health care providers; how primary care networks could be more effectively utilised to improve the provision of oral health services to rural communities; and identified strategies that could be implemented to improve oral health. Case studies of 14 rural communities across three Australian states. Between 2013 and 2016, 105 primary and 12 dental care providers were recruited and interviewed. Qualitative data were analysed in Nvivo 10 using thematic analysis. Quantitative data were subject to descriptive analysis using SPSSv20. Rural residents presented to primary care providers with a range of oral health problems from "everyday" to "10 per month". Management by primary care providers commonly included short-term pain relief, antibiotics, and advice that the patient see a dentist. The communication between non-dental primary care providers and visiting or regional dental practitioners was limited. Participants described a range of strategies that could contribute to better oral health and oral health oral services in their communities. Rural oral health could be improved by building oral health capacity of non-dental care providers; investing in oral health promotion and prevention activities; introducing more flexible service delivery practices to meet the dental needs of both public and private patients; and establishing more effective communication and referral pathways between rural primary and visiting/regional dental care providers.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 78 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 78 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 18 23%
Student > Bachelor 11 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 9%
Student > Postgraduate 4 5%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 3 4%
Other 14 18%
Unknown 21 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 29 37%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 13%
Social Sciences 3 4%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 3%
Computer Science 2 3%
Other 7 9%
Unknown 25 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 August 2017.
All research outputs
#10,258,480
of 11,563,317 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#3,435
of 3,715 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#224,227
of 265,372 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#113
of 121 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,563,317 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,715 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,372 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 121 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.