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Micro-heterogeneity of malaria transmission in the Peruvian Amazon: a baseline assessment underlying a population-based cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, August 2017
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Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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27 Dimensions

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71 Mendeley
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Title
Micro-heterogeneity of malaria transmission in the Peruvian Amazon: a baseline assessment underlying a population-based cohort study
Published in
Malaria Journal, August 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12936-017-1957-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Angel Rosas-Aguirre, Mitchel Guzman-Guzman, Dionicia Gamboa, Raul Chuquiyauri, Roberson Ramirez, Paulo Manrique, Gabriel Carrasco-Escobar, Carmen Puemape, Alejandro Llanos-Cuentas, Joseph M. Vinetz

Abstract

Understanding the dynamics of malaria transmission in diverse endemic settings is key for designing and implementing locally adapted and sustainable control and elimination strategies. A parasitological and epidemiological survey was conducted in September-October 2012, as a baseline underlying a 3-year population-based longitudinal cohort study. The aim was to characterize malaria transmission patterns in two contrasting ecological rural sites in the Peruvian Amazon, Lupuna (LUP), a riverine environment, and Cahuide (CAH), associated with road-linked deforestation. After a full population census, 1941 individuals 3 years and older (829 in LUP, 1112 in CAH) were interviewed, clinically examined and had a blood sample taken for the detection of malaria parasites by microscopy and PCR. Species-specific parasite prevalence was estimated overall and by site. Multivariate logistic regression models assessed risk factors for parasite infection by PCR, while SaTScan detected spatial clusters of PCR-positive individuals within each site. In addition, data from routine malaria surveillance in the period 2009-2012 were obtained. Parasite prevalence by PCR was higher in CAH than in LUP for Plasmodium vivax (6.2% vs. 3.9%) and for Plasmodium falciparum (2.6% vs. 1.2%). Among PCR-confirmed infections, asymptomatic (Asy) parasite carriers were always more common than symptomatic (Sy) infections for P. vivax (Asy/Sy ratio: 2/1 in LUP and 3.7/1 in CAH) and for P. falciparum (Asy/Sy ratio: 1.3/1 in LUP and 4/1 in CAH). Sub-patent (Spat) infections also predominated over patent (Pat) infections for both species: P. vivax (Spat/Pat ratio: 2.8/1 in LUP and 3.7/1 in CAH) and P. falciparum malaria (Spat/Pat ratio: 1.9/1 in LUP and 26/0 in CAH). For CAH, age, gender and living in a household without electricity were significantly associated with P. vivax infection, while only age and living in a household with electricity was associated with P. falciparum infection. For LUP, only household overcrowding was associated with P. falciparum infection. The spatial analysis only identified well-defined clusters of P. vivax and P. falciparum infected individuals in CAH. Reported malaria incidence indicated that malaria transmission has long occurred in LUP with primarily seasonal patterns, and confirmed a malaria outbreak in CAH since May 2012. This parasitological and epidemiological baseline assessment demonstrates that malaria transmission and parasite prevalence is heterogeneous in the Peruvian Amazon, and influenced by local socio-demographics and ecological contexts. Riverine and road construction/deforestation contexts must be taken into account in order to carry out effective anti-malaria control and elimination efforts.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 71 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 71 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 14 20%
Student > Master 12 17%
Student > Bachelor 11 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 11%
Other 3 4%
Other 8 11%
Unknown 15 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 20%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 7%
Environmental Science 4 6%
Other 15 21%
Unknown 20 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 October 2018.
All research outputs
#14,077,124
of 22,996,001 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#3,774
of 5,592 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#169,974
of 317,469 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#106
of 122 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,996,001 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,592 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 317,469 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 122 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.