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Evidence-based recommendations for natural bodybuilding contest preparation: nutrition and supplementation

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, May 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#17 of 797)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)

Citations

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Title
Evidence-based recommendations for natural bodybuilding contest preparation: nutrition and supplementation
Published in
Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, May 2014
DOI 10.1186/1550-2783-11-20
Pubmed ID
Authors

Eric R Helms, Alan A Aragon, Peter J Fitschen

Abstract

The popularity of natural bodybuilding is increasing; however, evidence-based recommendations for it are lacking. This paper reviewed the scientific literature relevant to competition preparation on nutrition and supplementation, resulting in the following recommendations. Caloric intake should be set at a level that results in bodyweight losses of approximately 0.5 to 1%/wk to maximize muscle retention. Within this caloric intake, most but not all bodybuilders will respond best to consuming 2.3-3.1 g/kg of lean body mass per day of protein, 15-30% of calories from fat, and the reminder of calories from carbohydrate. Eating three to six meals per day with a meal containing 0.4-0.5 g/kg bodyweight of protein prior and subsequent to resistance training likely maximizes any theoretical benefits of nutrient timing and frequency. However, alterations in nutrient timing and frequency appear to have little effect on fat loss or lean mass retention. Among popular supplements, creatine monohydrate, caffeine and beta-alanine appear to have beneficial effects relevant to contest preparation, however others do not or warrant further study. The practice of dehydration and electrolyte manipulation in the final days and hours prior to competition can be dangerous, and may not improve appearance. Increasing carbohydrate intake at the end of preparation has a theoretical rationale to improve appearance, however it is understudied. Thus, if carbohydrate loading is pursued it should be practiced prior to competition and its benefit assessed individually. Finally, competitors should be aware of the increased risk of developing eating and body image disorders in aesthetic sport and therefore should have access to the appropriate mental health professionals.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 1,100 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 9 <1%
United States 5 <1%
Denmark 3 <1%
Spain 3 <1%
United Kingdom 3 <1%
New Zealand 2 <1%
Netherlands 2 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
Other 7 <1%
Unknown 1064 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 315 29%
Student > Master 233 21%
Student > Postgraduate 89 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 80 7%
Other 77 7%
Other 176 16%
Unknown 130 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 321 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 175 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 143 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 118 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 57 5%
Other 138 13%
Unknown 148 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 508. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 May 2021.
All research outputs
#26,978
of 17,722,486 outputs
Outputs from Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition
#17
of 797 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#224
of 196,999 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,722,486 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 797 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 50.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 196,999 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them