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Population structure and dispersal routes of an invasive parasite, Fascioloides magna, in North America and Europe

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (63rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (68th percentile)

Mentioned by

wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
30 Mendeley
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Title
Population structure and dispersal routes of an invasive parasite, Fascioloides magna, in North America and Europe
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, October 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13071-016-1811-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ludmila Juhásová, Ivica Králová-Hromadová, Eva Bazsalovicsová, Gabriel Minárik, Jan Štefka, Peter Mikulíček, Lenka Pálková, Margo Pybus

Abstract

Fascioloides magna (Trematoda: Fasciolidae) is an important liver parasite of a wide range of free-living and domestic ruminants; it represents a remarkable species due to its large spatial distribution, invasive character, and potential to colonize new territories. The present study provides patterns of population genetic structure and admixture in F. magna across all enzootic regions in North America and natural foci in Europe, and infers migratory routes of the parasite on both continents. In total, 432 individuals from five North American enzootic regions and three European foci were analysed by 11 microsatellite loci. Genetic data were evaluated by several statistical approaches: (i) the population genetic structure of F. magna was inferred using program STRUCTURE; (ii) the genetic interrelationships between populations were analysed by PRINCIPAL COORDINATES ANALYSIS; and (iii) historical dispersal routes in North America and recent invasion routes in Europe were explored using MIGRATE. The analysis of dispersal routes of the parasite in North America revealed west-east and south-north lineages that partially overlapped in the central part of the continent, where different host populations historically met. The exact origin of European populations of F. magna and their potential translocation routes were determined. Flukes from the first European focus, Italy, were related to F. magna from northern Pacific coast, while parasites from the Czech focus originated from south-eastern USA, particularly South Carolina. The Danube floodplain forests (third and still expanding focus) did not display relationship with any North American population; instead the Czech origin of the Danube population was indicated. A serial dilution of genetic diversity along the dispersion route across central and eastern Europe was observed. The results of microsatellite analyses were compared to previously acquired outputs from mitochondrial haplotype data and correlated with past human-directed translocations and natural migration of the final cervid hosts of F. magna. The present study revealed a complex picture of the population genetic structure and interrelationships of North American and European populations, global distribution and migratory routes of F. magna and an origin of European foci.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 3%
Czechia 1 3%
Unknown 28 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 23%
Researcher 7 23%
Student > Master 6 20%
Student > Bachelor 2 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 7%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 4 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 37%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 7 23%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 13%
Environmental Science 2 7%
Social Sciences 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 4 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 August 2017.
All research outputs
#3,249,471
of 11,566,328 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#783
of 2,926 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#92,615
of 265,320 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#32
of 106 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,566,328 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,926 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,320 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 106 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.