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Association between serotonin transporter gene polymorphisms and increased suicidal risk among HIV positive patients in Uganda

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genetics, July 2017
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Title
Association between serotonin transporter gene polymorphisms and increased suicidal risk among HIV positive patients in Uganda
Published in
BMC Genetics, July 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12863-017-0538-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Allan Kalungi, Soraya Seedat, Sian M. J. Hemmings, Lize van der Merwe, Moses L. Joloba, Ann Nanteza, Noeline Nakassujja, Harriet Birabwa, Jennifer Serwanga, Pontiano Kaleebu, Eugene Kinyanda

Abstract

Persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) are at an increased risk of suicide. Increased suicidal risk is a predictor of future attempted and completed suicides and has been associated with poor quality of life and poor adherence with antiretroviral therapy. Clinical risk factors have low predictive value for suicide, hence the interest in potential neurobiological correlates and specific heritable markers of suicide vulnerability. The serotonin transporter gene has previously been implicated in the aetiology of increased suicidal risk in non-HIV infected study populations and its variations may provide a platform for identifying genetic risk for suicidality among PLWHA. The present cross-sectional study aimed at identifying two common genetic variants of the serotonin transporter gene and their association with increased suicidal risk among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive adults in Uganda. The prevalence of increased suicidal risk (defined as moderate to high risk suicidality on the suicidality module of the Mini Neuropsychiatric Interview (M.I.N.I) was 3.3% (95% CI, 2.0-5.3). The 5-HTTLPR was found to be associated with increased suicidal risk before Bonferroni correction (p-value = 0.0174). A protective effect on increased suicidal risk was found for the 5-HTTLPR/rs25531 S A allele (p-value = 0.0046)- which directs reduced expression of the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTT). The S A allele at the 5-HTTLPR/rs25531 locus is associated with increased suicidal risk among Ugandan PLWHA. Further studies are needed to validate this finding in Ugandan and other sub-Saharan samples.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 61 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 61 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 16%
Student > Postgraduate 7 11%
Student > Bachelor 5 8%
Researcher 5 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 7%
Other 9 15%
Unknown 21 34%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 23%
Psychology 7 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 5%
Other 7 11%
Unknown 21 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 August 2017.
All research outputs
#10,330,697
of 11,648,047 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genetics
#638
of 797 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#224,834
of 266,061 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genetics
#9
of 11 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 797 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.3. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.