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Reference-free determination of tissue absorption coefficient by modulation transfer function characterization in spatial frequency domain

Overview of attention for article published in BioMedical Engineering OnLine, August 2017
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Title
Reference-free determination of tissue absorption coefficient by modulation transfer function characterization in spatial frequency domain
Published in
BioMedical Engineering OnLine, August 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12938-017-0394-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Weiting Chen, Huijuan Zhao, Tongxin Li, Panpan Yan, Kuanxin Zhao, Caixia Qi, Feng Gao, Weiting Chen, Huijuan Zhao, Tongxin Li, Panpan Yan, Kuanxin Zhao, Caixia Qi, Feng Gao

Abstract

Spatial frequency domain (SFD) measurement allows rapid and non-contact wide-field imaging of the tissue optical properties, thus has become a potential tool for assessing physiological parameters and therapeutic responses during photodynamic therapy of skin diseases. The conventional SFD measurement requires a reference measurement within the same experimental scenario as that for a test one to calibrate mismatch between the real measurements and the model predictions. Due to the individual physical and geometrical differences among different tissues, organs and patients, an ideal reference measurement might be unavailable in clinical trials. To address this problem, we present a reference-free SFD determination of absorption coefficient that is based on the modulation transfer function (MTF) characterization. Instead of the absolute amplitude that is used in the conventional SFD approaches, we herein employ the MTF to characterize the propagation of the modulated lights in tissues. With such a dimensionless relative quantity, the measurements can be naturally corresponded to the model predictions without calibrating the illumination intensity. By constructing a three-dimensional database that portrays the MTF as a function of the optical properties (both the absorption coefficient μ a and the reduced scattering coefficient [Formula: see text]) and the spatial frequency, a look-up table approach or a least-square curve-fitting method is readily applied to recover the absorption coefficient from a single frequency or multiple frequencies, respectively. Simulation studies have verified the feasibility of the proposed reference-free method and evaluated its accuracy in the absorption recovery. Experimental validations have been performed on homogeneous tissue-mimicking phantoms with μ a ranging from 0.01 to 0.07 mm(-1) and [Formula: see text] = 1.0 or 2.0 mm(-1). The results have shown maximum errors of 4.86 and 7% for [Formula: see text] = 1.0 mm(-1) and [Formula: see text] = 2.0 mm(-1), respectively. We have also presented quantitative ex vivo imaging of human lung cancer in a subcutaneous xenograft mouse model for further validation, and observed high absorption contrast in the tumor region. The proposed method can be applied to the rapid and accurate determination of the absorption coefficient, and better yet, in a reference-free way. We believe this reference-free strategy will facilitate the clinical translation of the SFD measurement to achieve enhanced intraoperative hemodynamic monitoring and personalized treatment planning in photodynamic therapy.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 13 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 23%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 15%
Student > Master 2 15%
Student > Bachelor 1 8%
Researcher 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Unknown 3 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Physics and Astronomy 3 23%
Engineering 2 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 15%
Mathematics 1 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 8%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 4 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 August 2017.
All research outputs
#7,219,279
of 11,590,856 outputs
Outputs from BioMedical Engineering OnLine
#235
of 516 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#152,292
of 265,520 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BioMedical Engineering OnLine
#10
of 16 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,590,856 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 516 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,520 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 16 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.