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Review of key knowledge gaps in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency detection with regard to the safe clinical deployment of 8-aminoquinoline treatment regimens: a workshop report

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, March 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
policy
1 policy source
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

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93 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
159 Mendeley
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Title
Review of key knowledge gaps in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency detection with regard to the safe clinical deployment of 8-aminoquinoline treatment regimens: a workshop report
Published in
Malaria Journal, March 2013
DOI 10.1186/1475-2875-12-112
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lorenz von Seidlein, Sarah Auburn, Fe Espino, Dennis Shanks, Qin Cheng, James McCarthy, Kevin Baird, Catherine Moyes, Rosalind Howes, Didier Ménard, Germana Bancone, Ari Winasti-Satyahraha, Lasse S Vestergaard, Justin Green, Gonzalo Domingo, Shunmay Yeung, Ric Price

Abstract

The diagnosis and management of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a crucial aspect in the current phases of malaria control and elimination, which will require the wider use of 8-aminoquinolines for both reducing Plasmodium falciparum transmission and achieving the radical cure of Plasmodium vivax. 8-aminoquinolines, such as primaquine, can induce severe haemolysis in G6PD-deficient individuals, potentially creating significant morbidity and undermining confidence in 8-aminoquinoline prescription. On the other hand, erring on the side of safety and excluding large numbers of people with unconfirmed G6PD deficiency from treatment with 8-aminoquinolines will diminish the impact of these drugs. Estimating the remaining G6PD enzyme activity is the most direct, accessible, and reliable assessment of the phenotype and remains the gold standard for the diagnosis of patients who could be harmed by the administration of primaquine. Genotyping seems an unambiguous technique, but its use is limited by cost and the large range of recognized G6PD genotypes. A number of enzyme activity assays diagnose G6PD deficiency, but they require a cold chain, specialized equipment, and laboratory skills. These assays are impractical for care delivery where most patients with malaria live. Improvements to the diagnosis of G6PD deficiency are required for the broader and safer use of 8-aminoquinolines to kill hypnozoites, while lower doses of primaquine may be safely used to kill gametocytes without testing. The discussions and conclusions of a workshop conducted in Incheon, Korea in May 2012 to review key knowledge gaps in G6PD deficiency are reported here.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 159 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 1%
Saudi Arabia 2 1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Tanzania, United Republic of 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Ghana 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 149 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 23 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 13%
Student > Master 20 13%
Student > Bachelor 18 11%
Student > Postgraduate 14 9%
Other 35 22%
Unknown 28 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 56 35%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 21 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 16 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 6%
Engineering 7 4%
Other 20 13%
Unknown 30 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 20. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 September 2021.
All research outputs
#1,356,990
of 20,448,192 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#252
of 5,231 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15,213
of 203,089 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,448,192 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,231 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 203,089 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them