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Effects of thermal environment on sleep and circadian rhythm

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Physiological Anthropology, May 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#1 of 265)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
140 news outlets
blogs
9 blogs
twitter
53 tweeters
facebook
6 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user
video
17 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
200 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
394 Mendeley
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Title
Effects of thermal environment on sleep and circadian rhythm
Published in
Journal of Physiological Anthropology, May 2012
DOI 10.1186/1880-6805-31-14
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kazue Okamoto-Mizuno, Koh Mizuno

Abstract

The thermal environment is one of the most important factors that can affect human sleep. The stereotypical effects of heat or cold exposure are increased wakefulness and decreased rapid eye movement sleep and slow wave sleep. These effects of the thermal environment on sleep stages are strongly linked to thermoregulation, which affects the mechanism regulating sleep. The effects on sleep stages also differ depending on the use of bedding and/or clothing. In semi-nude subjects, sleep stages are more affected by cold exposure than heat exposure. In real-life situations where bedding and clothing are used, heat exposure increases wakefulness and decreases slow wave sleep and rapid eye movement sleep. Humid heat exposure further increases thermal load during sleep and affects sleep stages and thermoregulation. On the other hand, cold exposure does not affect sleep stages, though the use of beddings and clothing during sleep is critical in supporting thermoregulation and sleep in cold exposure. However, cold exposure affects cardiac autonomic response during sleep without affecting sleep stages and subjective sensations. These results indicate that the impact of cold exposure may be greater than that of heat exposure in real-life situations; thus, further studies are warranted that consider the effect of cold exposure on sleep and other physiological parameters.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 53 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 394 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 3 <1%
Australia 2 <1%
India 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Singapore 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 383 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 70 18%
Researcher 63 16%
Student > Master 56 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 44 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 24 6%
Other 60 15%
Unknown 77 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 66 17%
Engineering 40 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 29 7%
Psychology 24 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 22 6%
Other 115 29%
Unknown 98 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1178. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 December 2022.
All research outputs
#9,606
of 22,627,526 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Physiological Anthropology
#1
of 265 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#18
of 145,410 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Physiological Anthropology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,627,526 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 265 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 145,410 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them