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Physical and social environmental changes to promote walking among Dutch older adults in deprived neighbourhoods: the NEW.ROADS study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, August 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
11 tweeters

Readers on

mendeley
80 Mendeley
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Title
Physical and social environmental changes to promote walking among Dutch older adults in deprived neighbourhoods: the NEW.ROADS study
Published in
BMC Public Health, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3563-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

R. G. Prins, C. B. M. Kamphuis, J. M. de Graaf, A. Oenema, F. J. van Lenthe

Abstract

Physical activity is important for healthy ageing, and daily walking is seen as a feasible way to be active at older ages. Yet, many older persons, particularly in lower socioeconomic groups and residing in deprived neighbourhoods, are insufficiently active. Creating a physical and social neighbourhood environment that is more supportive for walking has the potential to improve walking behaviour. Current evidence of the impact of changes to the physical and/or social environmental on walking behaviour is scarce. The aim of the NEW.ROADS study is to design, implement and evaluate changes to the physical and social environment for the purpose of increasing walking behaviour among older residents of deprived neighbourhoods. Physical and social environmental interventions were developed by matching scientific evidence on environmental determinants of walking, with input from the target population and stakeholders, and ongoing neighbourhood activities. Specifically, a neighbourhood walking route was designed and marked, and neighbourhood walking groups were organised. These environmental interventions were evaluated in a four-armed experimental study. In addition, the design of the study to evaluate the effect of these environmental changes on walking behaviour is described. Designing and implementing environmental interventions is a complex endeavour, challenged by limited available theory and evidence. Input from the target population and professional stakeholders is essential, but may also put constraints on the evaluation. NTR3800 (registered 9/1/2013).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 80 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Denmark 1 1%
Unknown 78 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 18 23%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 11%
Student > Bachelor 8 10%
Researcher 8 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 6%
Other 5 6%
Unknown 27 34%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 13 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 6%
Sports and Recreations 5 6%
Psychology 5 6%
Other 10 13%
Unknown 32 40%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 May 2019.
All research outputs
#2,141,848
of 14,780,221 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#2,414
of 10,339 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#53,368
of 268,727 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,780,221 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,339 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,727 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them