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Enhancing intervertebral disc repair and regeneration through biology: platelet-rich plasma as an alternative strategy

Overview of attention for article published in Arthritis Research & Therapy, January 2013
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Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Readers on

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100 Mendeley
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Title
Enhancing intervertebral disc repair and regeneration through biology: platelet-rich plasma as an alternative strategy
Published in
Arthritis Research & Therapy, January 2013
DOI 10.1186/ar4353
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shan-Zheng Wang, Yun-Feng Rui, Qi Tan, Chen Wang

Abstract

Intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is a common orthopedic disease associated with mechanical changes that may result in significant pain. Current treatments for IDD mainly depend on conservative therapies and spinal surgeries that are only able to relieve the symptoms but do not address the cause of the degeneration and even accelerate the degeneration of adjacent segments. This has prompted research to improve our understanding of the biology of intervertebral disc healing and into methods to enhance the regenerative process. Recently, biological therapies, including active substances, gene therapy and tissue engineering based on certain cells, have been attracting more attention in the field of intervertebral disc repair and regeneration. Early selection of suitable biological treatment is an ideal way to prevent or even reverse the progressive trend of IDD. Growth factors have been enjoying more popularity in the field of regeneration of IDD and many have been proved to be effective in reversing the degenerative trend of the intervertebral disc. Identification of these growth factors has led to strategies to deliver platelet-derived factors to the intervertebral disc for regeneration. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is the latest technique to be evaluated for promoting intervertebral disc healing. Activation of the PRP leads to the release of growth factors from the α-granules in the platelet cytoplasm. These growth factors have been associated with the initiation of a healing cascade that leads to cellular chemotaxis, angiogenesis, synthesis of collagen matrix, and cell proliferation. This review describes the current understanding of IDD and related biological therapeutic strategies, especially the promising prospects of PRP treatment. Future limitations and perspectives of PRP therapy for IDD are also discussed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 100 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Netherlands 1 1%
Unknown 97 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 18%
Researcher 12 12%
Student > Master 9 9%
Student > Postgraduate 8 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 8%
Other 28 28%
Unknown 17 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 46 46%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 8%
Engineering 2 2%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 2%
Other 9 9%
Unknown 19 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 October 2017.
All research outputs
#7,154,621
of 11,945,047 outputs
Outputs from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#1,197
of 1,887 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#90,243
of 190,516 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#22
of 37 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,945,047 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,887 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.7. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 190,516 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 37 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.